Mahanandi

Living in Consciousness ~ Indi(r)a’s Food and Garden Weblog

Buggani (Puffed Rice Upma)

Puffed Rice, Borugulu, Murmura, Mamra, ArisiPoriBuggani, the name itself makes my mouth water. A simple and common dish, prepared with puffed rice or borugulu , it’s traditionally served as breakfast in our Rayalaseema region. My mother makes the best buggani in the whole world, so I follow my mothers recipe exactly to the last words.

In Nandyala, my hometown in India, we buy freshly made puffed rice from street vendors. Here in US, in Indian grocery shops, puffed rice is available in only one size i.e. 14 OZ packets. Usually I prepare Buggani with half of that (25o g) packet for us two.

Recipe:

Puffed rice
One big onion - finely chopped lengthwise
4 green chillies - made into paste
1 tsp each of salt and oil
Pinch of turmeric
Popu
1/2 tsp each of cumin, mustard seeds, urad dal, few curry leaves and one red chilli
extras
1 tablespoon of roasted chickpea powder(putnala pappu podi)
1/4 cup of roasted peanuts
1 lime

Buggani needs hot, spiciness from green chillies. So don’t hesitate to add enough green chillies.

Onions, Green chilli paste, Turmeric, Curry leaves, Urad dal, mustard, cumin&redchilli, pappula podi, lemon and roasted peanuts

Preparation:

First, take a big pot, fill half of it with tap water and add puffed rice to the water. Because of lightweight, they will float. Using your hands push them under water for few seconds. Let them soak water. Exactly after 5 minutes, remove them from water by taking handfuls and firmly squeezing the water from them by pressing the hands together tightly. Remove them all from water in this way and put them in a colander.

Puffed Rice, Puffed Rice in Water, Removing Puffed rice from water with my hands

In a large frying pan over medium heat, heat one tsp of oil and do the popu (frying the mustard seeds, cumin, red chillies and curry leaves in oil). Add onions, sauté them until light brown, then add green chilli paste, sauté it till it turns from bright green to light green colour, don’t brown it. Finally add a pinch of turmeric and salt. Stir them all once and turn off the heat.

Add this hot onion mixture immediately to puffed rice along with roasted peanuts and roasted chickpea powder. Mix them all together and add salt if needed. That’s it. Serve them as soon as you prepare them.

Sautéing the ingredientsMixing all the ingredients with soaked puffed rice

Just before eating, squeeze few drops of lime. We usually serve this Buggani along with few pieces of finely chopped onions (washed in water beforehand), some more roasted peanuts, and a lemon wedge.

Buggani (puffed rice or murmura upma)  - On the side a lemon wedge, onions and roasted peanuts.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Chana Dal-Roasted (Dalia), Murmura (Borugulu) (Tuesday July 5, 2005 at 3:43 pm- permalink)

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40 comments for Buggani (Puffed Rice Upma) »

  1. ive never heard of this dish but it sounds good- i love puffed rice (though I call it murmura)

    Comment by tanvi — July 5, 2005 @ 5:12 pm

  2. Indira- this is the same as a dish I learned from a Marati friend. But yours looks so much like bhelpuri, yum. My friend’s version has no onion but raw grated carrots and raw tomatoes added. I have to try your version with the roasted chickpeas powder (I love to use it in chutneys).

    Comment by mikajackfruit — July 5, 2005 @ 5:19 pm

  3. Tanvi - If you like murmura(or borugulu in Telugu), then you should try this too.

    Mika - This is an original Rayalaseema recipe, I didn’t change it a bit and I don’t want to, it’s perfect the way it is.
    But Marati version sounds great too. I love bhelpuri and anything with murmuras.
    Please try this recipe and let me know, so easy to prepare too.

    Comment by Indira — July 5, 2005 @ 5:29 pm

  4. We made a couple of your recipes yesterday; they were wonderful!

    Comment by Stephanie — July 5, 2005 @ 7:05 pm

  5. yum. this reminds me of bhel puri which i love but have never made.
    What kind of green chillis do you use (trying to get a feel for the heat level) and it looks like you used the seeds too? right?

    i feel an indian cooking phase coming along soon.

    Comment by sam — July 5, 2005 @ 8:02 pm

  6. Stephanie, really? I am very glad.What did you make?

    Sam - I used cayane peppers. For this recipe, just add one or two more chillies (of anykind) than what you can usually tolerate, this kind of little bit extra hotness is needed for this recipe.Yep, I used seeds and everything, we need that heat.

    Comment by Indira — July 5, 2005 @ 8:56 pm

  7. This looks fantasitc, I will keep an eye out for puffed rice

    Comment by clare eats — July 6, 2005 @ 7:17 am

  8. Never heard of this recipe. Looks yummy. I too love borugulu esp. when they are made with jaggery(dont know what its called) and ofcourse Bhelpuri. Love to see more authentic dished like this Indira.

    Comment by kaleidoscope — July 6, 2005 @ 11:12 am

  9. Clare - Thanks, you can always buy puffed rice at your local Indian grocery shop.

    K- I know what you are talking about. Rice and jaggery balls. I don’t have jaggery in my pantry right now, as soon as I restock, I am going to make this sweet. We both love those sweet balls. And thanks.

    Comment by Indira — July 6, 2005 @ 1:15 pm

  10. Hi Indira, this is so enticing! My problem though, I don’t think we have puffed rice here. How do I make my own? Soak rice then toast?

    Comment by Karen — July 6, 2005 @ 8:49 pm

  11. Karen, really? Iam surprised, I thought all the southeast Asian countries were familiar with puffed rice. I saw some posts about it in Malaysian, Thailand, Indonesian blogs.

    Sand is poured into a big wok and the rice is thrown in. It puffs like popcorn. That’s how they make puffed rice in India. No soaking of rice in water.
    We never make it at home, always buys from street vendors or from shops. Maybe you should try at local Indian grocery shops, don’t you have any?

    Comment by Indira — July 7, 2005 @ 8:51 am

  12. We have puffed rice snacks but they are sweet and ready to eat blocks. There’s another kind, duman or pinipig but it’s more like a cereal.

    There are several Indian restaurants in Metro Manila but hardly any stores that I know of. Unlike in the neighbouring countries, there are not as many Indians here.

    There is fire under the wok and sand is mixed with the rice? How do they clean it afterwards?

    I am now wickedly thinking of puffing my own rice according to your instructions.

    Comment by Karen — July 7, 2005 @ 7:37 pm

  13. Karen- I didn’t give you the whole process in my earlier comment.

    This is the exact way they make puffed rice: They take paddy(Rice with husks),will soak them in hot water for a day. This paddy is then dried under hot Sun for at least a day. This process of soaking and drying is required because of ricepaddy doesn’t have any moisture content in them like corn.
    This dried paddy, then is roasted in special big sand filled ovens, under huge controlled fire.(Iam lack of words here to translate this process into English.)In this frying process the rice pops out of husk, and they use special big sieves to seperate the popped rice and sand. After this, they use special fans to seperate husk and puffed rice. I hope I am able to explain this to you clearly.
    I think you can try it on a small scale if you could get paddy at your place and using a microwave oven.

    Comment by Indira — July 7, 2005 @ 8:53 pm

  14. Thanks Indira! I’m actually interested in approximating the traditional procedure (I’m an anachronism, a friend told me). We have large iron woks which have clay lids. Or perhaps the ovens you mention are similar to those they use to make our duman (there’s a picture on the link I added above).

    The whole process you wrote is very similar to duman-making except that ours uses immature red glutinous rice.

    Comment by Karen — July 8, 2005 @ 2:25 pm

  15. Posts of the Week

    Post of the Week would like to be considered for appointment to the Supreme Court and promise to uphold everyone’s right to put any foods on a stick. I. I pick a post from Mahandi, but really, I want you to check out the whole darn blog. I don’t kno…

    Trackback by Too Many Chefs — July 9, 2005 @ 12:47 pm

  16. Hello, Indira–I just found your site through a link on another blog, and put a link to it on my blog a couple of days ago.

    And then, I saw that both of us were featured by Barrett on Too Many Chefs “Posts of the Week” and wanted to congratulate you, and also say–what a great blog!

    Anyway, I will keep reading you now that I have found you!

    Comment by Barbara — July 10, 2005 @ 12:56 am

  17. Hi Indira,

    Do u know how to make “garelu”,I don’t know what u call it in yourpart of Andhra, but in Telengana..it’s called by that name. They are savoury snacks mae of lentils.

    Comment by Swathi — August 22, 2005 @ 4:09 pm

  18. excellent dish!!

    Comment by mpadmaja — September 17, 2005 @ 12:51 am

  19. Thanks for the recipe. Borugula Thirugavatha is my favorite breakfast dish, though I’m going to make it for Dinner now.

    Comment by Vamsi Polarpu — November 13, 2005 @ 9:38 pm

  20. I prepared and it is nice.
    Give me some more ideas of new dishes.
    Let us be in touch
    Thanks

    Comment by NALINI P.S. — March 20, 2006 @ 7:57 pm

  21. Hi Indira,

    How about adding Mirchi Bajji with Buggani.
    I am from Ndl right now in chennai. I dont know cooking. Your blog may become my teacher once I start cooking my self.

    Comment by Joseph — April 28, 2006 @ 8:18 am

  22. Hi Indra, wooooow sounds yummy…shall try soon.Thanx

    Comment by Veda — July 1, 2006 @ 3:09 pm

  23. Hi Indira,

    I am from Anantapur . We call this as “uggani”. Never heard about buggani. Is it a typo or do you really call it buggani?

    Kavitha

    Comment by Kavitha — July 6, 2006 @ 9:23 am

  24. hi

    Comment by jyosthna reddy — August 8, 2006 @ 5:23 am

  25. Hi Indira,

    Thanks a lot for the dish. I prepared it and myself and my husband both enjoyed it very much.
    Thanks,
    Kamala

    Comment by kamala — August 8, 2006 @ 2:40 pm

  26. I know this dish and its one of my favourites.My mom used to prepare this ,she was born in karnataka and this dish is a famous breakfast in karnataka so she learned it from there.we use tamarind instead of leamon but i think lemon will be good.

    Comment by vikranthi — December 4, 2006 @ 10:42 pm

  27. HEY THIS IS A DISH WHICH IS VERY COMMON AT MY HOME AS BREAKFAST I LIKE IT.

    MY MOM DOES IT VERY WELL, THERE IS ONE SUGGESTION I WOUL LIKE TO ADD, ALONG WITH GREEN CHILLIES ADD GINGER AND GARLICS POPDS AND GRIND THEM COARSELY THEN GO AHEAD WITH OTHER STEPS…THIS WOULS MAKE IT VERY YUMMY…

    Comment by anu — July 11, 2007 @ 10:14 am

  28. Thanks for this recipe! We made it today and it may become a staple over here!

    Comment by Jen — September 30, 2007 @ 8:30 am

  29. Hi Indira,
    This became a big hit and a favorite in my house. Thanks for the recipe.. Keep up the good work.
    Cheers,
    Subhadra

    Comment by subhadra — October 4, 2007 @ 2:55 am

  30. We call this as “Vaggani” in Adoni/Bellary/Raichur area. Try this with mirch bajji. This is available in any hotel in the area as “Vaggani Puggi(mirichi bajji)”

    Comment by Madhu — December 13, 2007 @ 10:01 am

  31. Hi Indira,
    This dish is wonderful. I ate it in Raichur once when I went there for in-plant training. They call it vaggani there. I tried to prepare this dish at home but could not get the exact taste. Roasted Chickpea flour was missing in my dish. Now I got the exact taste of it and even my 1 yr old kid loves it lot. I reduced the amount of chilly though for him. Thank you and will keep looking forward for more new recipes.

    Comment by Pranathi — December 21, 2007 @ 1:00 am

  32. Just a follow up Indira (I stopped by in Sept.). We have been making this at least once a week, sometimes more. It is a nice, quick breakfast item, even working people can easily make this. I have linked to this post from my blog at http://shakahaari.blogspot.com/.

    Hello Jen, congratulations on your website. It looks good and informative. Glad to read that you tried and liked the buggani preparation. Yes, buggani is quite easy to prepare at home, tasty and filling too. Thanks for adding the link.
    - Indira

    Comment by Jen — March 19, 2008 @ 7:51 pm

  33. Hi Indira
    We call them chirmulyo in konkani. From childhood I relished them only as a bhel. I tried this wonderful recipe today and it was fabulous. I followed the exact recipe and and as per one of the reader’s comment, i also added ginger garlic to the green chilly paste. Thanks a lot.

    Comment by kavita — June 8, 2010 @ 4:21 am

  34. Hi Indira,

    I love your website and all your recipes!

    Comment by Madhu — July 9, 2010 @ 4:30 pm

  35. Hello Indira,
    I started following your blog after my sister suggestion. I am excited that you blogged this recipe. there is a one small change inthe way we make in the kurnool dist. instead of lime we actually soak tamarind and add it after the onions are cooked. when the oil starts to seperate out we add the borugulu( which are sprinkled lightly with dalia powder,( so the whole dish is not gooyie).i think this change is coz
    the lime is not avaialble at times in rural areas.

    Comment by sharmila — May 8, 2011 @ 8:34 am

  36. I saw a couple of big packets of Murmura lying at home and suddenly remembered the Vaggani I used to eat as a child whenever we visited our relatives in Raichur District. A google search for recipe brought me here and the photographs look exactly the same. Now this is going to be our weekend breakfast and/or evening snack soon.

    Comment by Azhar — July 10, 2011 @ 10:15 pm

  37. I’m from kadapa. Today I tried it,taste is too good. I’m searching for it since while. thanks for the recipe.

    Sincerely,
    Suresh.

    Comment by suresh — September 20, 2011 @ 1:04 pm

  38. వుగ్గాని బాగుందండి. మా అమ్మ బొరుగులు కూడా బాణట్లో వేసి వేయిస్తుంది, మీరు జస్ట్ తడి బొరుగుల్లో వేయించిన వుల్లియాలు కలిఫేశారు. ఇలా చేసి చూస్తాం.

    Comment by Sk — March 9, 2012 @ 3:59 am

  39. mee borugula uggani bagundi adi mirchi bajji tho thinali

    Comment by subbu — April 3, 2012 @ 2:40 am

  40. I’m Srilankan… One day my friend said about this dish.. I found this receip on this website. This was delecious. Now I’m fond of this and regularly prepare once in a week.
    Thanks for this receip.
    Thilan
    Kuwait.

    Comment by thilangani — July 8, 2014 @ 8:54 am

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