Mahanandi

Living in Consciousness ~ Indi(r)a’s Food and Garden Weblog

Sorghum Roti (Jonna Rotte, Jowar Roti)

 Jonna rotte with curry (Sorghum roti with curry)

Very popular in villages and small towns as an accompaniment to meat and vegetable gravy curries, sorghum roti is one of the traditional recipes of India. As the name suggests, the rotis are prepared from sorghum flour. Instead of rolling pin, hands are used to shape the sorghum dough into a round, flat, thin circle. Because sorghum flour is gluten-free flour, it’s very tough to spread the dough without breaking the shape, and one really needs hands-on experience and many failed attempts to get the skill.

I am very sad to say that it is becoming one of those ‘dying’ kind of recipes. My mother and grandmother generations perfected the sorghum roti preparation. But coming to my generation, the ‘educated’, the ’sophisticated’ ones, who can talk about baguettes and brie’s for hours and goes to great lengths to prepare and showoff knowledge of foreign cuisines, have no interest and can’t give the time of the day to learn or master the technique of this classic Indian recipe. It is not that we don’t like the taste. We love it! Imagine the warm paratha taste, multiply by 10 times, that’s how a good, well made sorghum roti tastes. In artisan hands, it puffs like puri - all on its own. No leavening agents and oil or ghee are added. Just fresh sorghum flour, warm water and touch of fire - pure grain power in its glory.

Making a prefect sorghum roti is a skill that I wanted to master with all my heart. For me, it is not just a recipe, but an Indian tradition that I wished to be a part of. The process is difficult to explain in written words and pretty much useless. Again this is one of those recipes, where one must be in the kitchen next to the cook, to know what they are talking about. One really needs a visual experience to understand the recipe. Well that’s how I feel anyway, so I’m going to keep the recipe directions simple for a change, and instead show the process in images.

Spreading the dough into thin round shape using hands

Prepare dough by gradually adding and mixing hot water. After a rest period of 10 to 15 minutes, the dough is kneaded and divided into lemon sized balls. Then, using palm of the right hand, on a flat board, the dough is spread into flat, thin round.

Cooking the roti

The doughspread is carefully lifted and placed on a hot iron tava (griddle). We use a separate tava just for making these rotis. On medium-high heat, roti is roasted slowly. Water is applied with a cotton cloth on the surface of roti, before turning it to the other side.

Roti is turned to otherside

After two to three minutes of cooking, roti is turned to the other side and cooked until done.


Sorghum roti (Jonna Rotte, Jowar roti) with curry
Jonna Rotte (Sorghum Roti) with curry ~ our meal today.

Recipe origin and source: Rayalaseema(Andhra, India) and Amma.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Amma & Authentic Andhra, Bajri/Jowar Flour, Millet, Jowar (Jonnalu) (Tuesday April 4, 2006 at 10:49 pm- permalink)

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71 comments for Sorghum Roti (Jonna Rotte, Jowar Roti) »

  1. Just today I read about this Jowar roti’s in “GM’s” and “The cooks cottage” blog and was wondering about working with fingers for these rotis. It hooked me and now I see one more of it, i am definitely going to try this.
    Great photos again Indira, and nicely written post too :)

    Comment by Karthi Kannan — April 4, 2006 @ 11:07 pm

  2. Indira,

    My mother has been trying this roti for several years and still can’t master the art of making them without tearing the rotis during the prep process.

    How soft or hard is the dough after its mixed with hot water?

    I’ve seen this eaten with south indian version of baingan bhartha and/or some pulses and spicy chutney powder… yum!

    Thanks for the post,
    Jayashree

    Comment by jayashree — April 5, 2006 @ 12:52 am

  3. Hi Indira- I wanted to make jowar bhakri and bought this flour. But as you say it is quite hard to spread it and transfer it. I also heard that if flour is not very fresh, it can be difficult to make. Your rotis look thin and delicious.

    Comment by mika — April 5, 2006 @ 1:48 am

  4. I am from Karnataka and we make these roti’s for lunch and dinner.Unfortunately this is one thing I couldn’t do and I always crave for it.We make different types in this..plain jowar roti,sajje roti (I dont know what they call in telugu) and Jowar flour mixed with green chillies,curry leaves,salt,chilli powder and little bit of besan.

    Comment by Celeste — April 5, 2006 @ 7:56 am

  5. Indira , thanx for the recipe. I have never tasted sorgham roti before. Looks yummy. And hey what r u talking about .. the roti looks perfect to me. Look at that perfect round shape , when i make rotis my kitchen becomes a geaogrpahy class each one looks like different country maps LOL ! Is sorghum flour the jowar flours that we get in the store or its sold as sorghum flour.

    Comment by priya — April 5, 2006 @ 8:43 am

  6. What a coincidence ! I was just looking at this blog http://thecookscottage.typepad.com/curry/2006/01/bhakri_jowar_ro.html yesterday for Jowar roti. I make Makke ki roti (Maize flour) never tried jowar roti. I remember my mom used to add grated mooli (daichon/radish) or grated giya (bottleguard). Your’s looks perfect (just like my mom’s).

    Comment by Krithika Ramachandran — April 5, 2006 @ 9:01 am

  7. Hey Indira:

    I was actually planning on attempting to make this jonna rotte for the VERY first time soon :) to see how far I can get in the process. This was my Summer and Winter holiday breakfast item when I visited my grandparents. My mom makes it pretty often for dinner at our home now!

    Did you buy the flour in the Indian stores here. If yes, what brand did you buy?

    Comment by Luv2cook — April 5, 2006 @ 9:10 am

  8. The rotis look perfect Indira. The roti will taste even better when heated directly on fire after it is roasted on both sides. You can also make these rotis on wet cloth . Place the dough on wet cloth and press with your fingers evenly , wetting your fingers occasionaly with water to avoid the dough sticking on to your fingers. Once the dough is spread evenly just place the spread dough along with the cloth on tava with the cloth on the upper side. And then peel the cloth. The rest of the preparation process is same.
    We also make sajja rotte in the same way except that we sprinkle some sesame seeds on it. And it tastes yum with chintakaya pacchadi and butter in summer :) .

    Comment by Greeshma — April 5, 2006 @ 9:24 am

  9. I’ve never had this before. I bought jowar flour when I was going through a health kick and never even opened the packet. I’ll have to try this recipe.

    The curry on the side looks delicious!!!!

    Comment by Saffron Hut — April 5, 2006 @ 9:29 am

  10. I was looking at the recipes for jonna roti/sajje roti/bhakri/ragi roti just yesterday.

    I was trying to find out the fiber content in the millets, especially jowar and bajra and was planning to make the rotis as they seem to have lot of nutritious content.

    I read about sorghum roti in a couple of your earlier posts and was wondering when you would post this recipe.

    Thanks,
    jasper

    Comment by jasper — April 5, 2006 @ 9:47 am

  11. Hi Indira,
    My mom also used to do this roti.Nice to see ur presentation.Thank u
    Vineela

    Comment by vineelakrishna — April 5, 2006 @ 11:25 am

  12. nice presentation.

    Comment by Lakshmi — April 5, 2006 @ 11:38 am

  13. You seem to be too shy to write about your perfect results so I’m going to say - that’s perfect and you got A+.

    Kudos to you for perfecting a classic Indian recipe and I know very well how hard one must try to get that kind of perfect results you’ve produced here.

    Comment by Rama — April 5, 2006 @ 11:49 am

  14. Naaku jonna rotte cheyyataniki dhairyam saripoledu Indira. Yours look sooooo good.

    My granny makes the most AWESOME jonne rotte in the whole world and I am not exaggerating. I have asked my dad to send me pics of her making it and he is going to send me some soon.

    Comment by Santhi — April 5, 2006 @ 12:02 pm

  15. Hi Indira,

    Till now I don’t know the english word for jonna pindi.Thanks for the recipe.W

    Comment by srilaxmi — April 5, 2006 @ 12:15 pm

  16. Hi Indira,

    Whoo…this is so delicious.I have boarder line cholestrol so this roti is the best diet for me. Thanks for the recipe.You are so wonderful…..I like all your recipes and everyday coming to your site for menu.
    regards
    laxmi.

    Comment by srilaxmi — April 5, 2006 @ 12:19 pm

  17. Thanks for sharing your experiences and traditions of sorghum roti, on this blog.

    Give it a try, Karthi. Thanks!

    Hi Jayashree… Dough consistency is like chapati dough, not too tight or too lose. That’s all I’m going to say.:)

    Hi Mika… Yep, fresh flour makes a difference in the preparation and how the end product tastes. The fresh, the better it tastes.

    Hi Celeste… We also have the tradition of preparing all 3 kinds of rotis you mentioned. We also call it sojja rotte in Telugu, it is mainly prepared during Sankranthi festival.

    Aa… Priya, you are a sweetheart, thanks for your kind words.:)
    It is sold as sorghum/jowar flour in Indian stores here.

    Hi K.R… thanks for the link.
    Makki ki roti… yum, that I’ve never prepared at home.

    Hi L2C…we both share same traditions it seems. My grand parents also prepare ‘jonna rotte’ almost daily for breakfast and my parents for dinner everyday. If anyone asks them about their perfect drug free health, they say it’s because of habit of jonna roti for dinner.:)
    For the firsttime, I brought this flour from India, not much, about 2kgs. Previously I was making them with the flour avialable here in Indian grocery shops, forgot the brand name.

    Hi Greeshma, thanks for sharing your tips.
    Chintakaya chutney… you started a new craving, oh boy…now I want it.:)

    Hi SF.. thanks, can you guess what it is?:)

    Hi Jasper… thanks!
    How was the trip to HYD? Welcome back.

    Thanks Vineela and Lakshmi.

    Srilaxmi…thanks, give it a try then. Not only healthy, tastes great too.

    Thanks Rama for your nice words. A+… you are generous, aren’t you?:)

    Santhi… Thanks. Atfirst I was like you, but I wanted to learn and I did. Ofcourse there were lot of failed attempts, but for the last few years, I’m able to dishout decent jonna rottelu.:)

    Comment by Indira — April 5, 2006 @ 12:32 pm

  18. So can we expect a recipe for chintakaya pacchadi pretty soon :) ?

    Comment by Greeshma — April 5, 2006 @ 1:05 pm

  19. I have never tasted this roti. Whenever I see this flour at the indian groceries, I wonder what is it for. Looks delicious and easy to prepare. Great pictures.

    Comment by RP — April 5, 2006 @ 1:14 pm

  20. Hi,

    I am Kartik Kannan at Sulekha.com (www.Sulekha.com) and I’m writing to you about your blog.
    Before I proceed, let me apologise for this unsolicited comment in your blog. I googled for good Indian blogs and found yours.
    Ok, now to why am I writing to you? I’m compiling a list of the best writings in Indian blogosphere and showcasing them on Sulekha.com. Sulekha (means ‘good writing’) has been encouraging good writers and showcasing great writing for well over 6 years.
    I want to include your blog entries on Sulekha by creating a parallel blog for you. By creating a parallel blog on Sulekha Blogs, you can dramatically boost the number of people viewing your posts and commenting on them.
    To know more click here

    Cheers,

    Kartik Kannan
    Team Sulekha

    Indira replies:
    Hello Karthik Kannan,
    I know about Sulekha, member and participant there since its beginning, stopped visiting the site when it went commercial.
    I’ve checked the link you provided. Could not find any examples of “parallel blogs” there, only individual oldstyle blog entries.
    Before joining your project, I’d like to see examples of parallel blogs on Sulekha. Thanks!

    Comment by kartik kannan — April 6, 2006 @ 7:55 am

  21. Hi Indira yummy jonna roti I like this roti when it served with chintakaya pachadi and gutti vankaya curra that combination is so yummy.

    I tried here but that taste different from the ones we make in india my mom makes it very thin but mine is not so good. Ur roti’s shape is perfect and looks thin too.

    Comment by tanuja — April 6, 2006 @ 12:25 pm

  22. Indira, just realized that the curry looks like Masala Shalgam. I remember seeing one of your earlier posts.

    Comment by Krithika Ramachandran — April 7, 2006 @ 9:18 am

  23. I adore your posts. I rarely cook but these posts make me feel so incredibly nostalgic.

    Comment by Gigolo Kitty — April 7, 2006 @ 9:19 am

  24. I just somehow found your blog and I love it. The colorful foods, flavors, wonderful photography and even recipes! Everything is amazing and I am so happy to have found this and I look forward to more meals! You make some of my favorite foods, and others that are new to me and I would enjoy trying them. Thank you for offering this to the world!

    Comment by Leslie — April 9, 2006 @ 12:18 am

  25. what is the difference between Jowar and Bajara

    Comment by m,k,pandita — September 17, 2006 @ 12:55 am

  26. Hi Indira!
    I love your recipe for Jowar roti as well as the site in general… I live in B’lore and ate some of these rotis at a restaurant here, and will try them at home soon.
    One way of getting the rotis to spread better, could be to put a ball of dough between two plastic sheets and rolling it lightly/spreading it with your hand. We used that for Akki roti (rice rotis)and it worked.

    Comment by Anita — September 18, 2006 @ 10:52 am

  27. it’s of great knowledge for the dying Roti
    well im a 2nd year B.Sc. Agri.n Tech. AAIDU; student n im studing presently on jowar n u provide a good exposure

    thanking you

    Comment by avijit agnihotri — October 28, 2006 @ 5:25 am

  28. Dear Indira,

    Your posts are really great and cool. i’d like to try Jowar roti but i dont know what “Jowar flour” called in Tamil to buy the flour. pls help me.
    Thanks in advance
    Regards,
    Chitra

    Comment by chitra — November 3, 2006 @ 7:03 pm

  29. Derar Indiragaaru,

    Your post brings back nostalgic memories of my stay in Nandyal as a Kid.

    I have taken a print of the recipie. I hope my wife can make the rotte.

    Basically we are from the Coastal area. the Jonna rotte is not part of our day to day diet. So it is difficult to make the same.

    Hope to get it right.

    Comment by Vinod — November 20, 2006 @ 10:56 pm

  30. Hi,

    I’m allergic to Calcium and can’t stand wheat/basin/etc that have calcium. Does Jowar has any calcium in it? What are its nutrition facts? If jowar doesn’t have calcium, I would consider myself fortunate to have found something to eat at last!

    TIA

    Comment by matrix — December 24, 2006 @ 11:55 pm

  31. your web site is very nice. we enjoyed with u r web site. do u know the :JONNARETTE MECHINE:like taco machine of mexico for bulk production.

    Comment by geetha — August 10, 2007 @ 10:29 pm

  32. Could you plse provide quantities..ie flour,water & any salt? Thanks.

    Comment by Margaret — October 8, 2007 @ 3:29 pm

  33. JOLAD ROTTI — What we call it in Kannada. We are masters of making it, I dare to say that as I have never see a good one( forget best one) out of North Karnataka. Even people from my state — B’lore , Mysore are mistaken them for papad ;) .

    Without dedication you cannot make them. I can easily scarify 5 star meals for one with Kadak Rotti + chicken curry or Bengan ( Enagai i.e gutti vankai)

    By the by your roti’s are not thin enough you know that :D

    Comment by Chandrashekha — October 16, 2007 @ 1:55 am

  34. Hi Indira,
    We’re from North Karnataka region (Belgaum district, Bailhongal) and for us Jowar Roti is a must for lunch and dinner. As you’ve mentioned in your blog, I agree that it is little hard to get a proper shape unless the dough is of right consistency. In my place almost 90% (including me!) of the women can make the best (thin, round & puffed) rotis. In our household learning to prepare good rotis is a must for the girls before they get married. So, we the three sisters had to learn from our elders of course along with our education (M.A., M. Sc. Ph. D, & M. Com). May be because we love the taste & is a main dish for us…we learned it.
    As you mentioned the process is really difficult to explain in written words. BTW, it’s not your fault that you didn’t get good result. It’s the packaged flour that you get here which makes it hard to make good rotis. The flour should be fresh, 10-15 days old is OK but not beyond that.
    While making the dough if you use boiling water you’ll get good rotis. Once you put the roti on a hot tava you should apply water immediately i.e., you shouldn’t let the upper surface of the roti get dried up.
    BTW, I’ll get you the video whenever I visit India.
    Chandrashekha you’re most welcome to visit our native place (India) and of course, Memphis, TN from where I’m writing this comment.

    Comment by SHANTA ALLI — November 9, 2007 @ 10:33 am

  35. hi,i know of an easier way to make jonna rotti,try this,i am sure it will be very useful.
    take one and a half cup of water in a vessl,bring it to boil,now add a cup of jonna pindi at a time in to the vessel(dont mix now),let the water cover the flour,wait for a minute,then mix it well with out lumps,take the vessel off the stove,keep it covered for five min,then u can easily make balls,(u can add more flour to this if needed), and roll it with a rolling pin ,it is not at all messy,then roast it on tava,need not wet the roti while roasting.i make this almost everyday.the rotis come out really soft even for amatures.by the way,i am from anantapur.try it.

    Comment by pallavi hatti — November 29, 2007 @ 2:19 am

  36. i really want to try this jonna roti. thanks for the recipe

    Comment by chitti — January 15, 2008 @ 4:01 pm

  37. Hi Indira,
    Ur recipe sounds very good and m going to try it now.Can u just tell me what sort of curries ll go with jonnarotte.
    and I also have a small query, “Is jonnarotte easily digestable”?
    Hope to see your reply,
    Thanks
    Deepa

    Comment by Deepa — February 13, 2008 @ 6:11 am

  38. I just started making jowar/jonna roi. It tastes good but not easy to make. It is time consuming… time taken for 1 roti equal to 3 regular wheat rotis. Since we like the taste I make it every alternate day since 2 months. Its expensive than wheat flour. Pallavi.. I’m gonna try your method. I usually add warm water and try to make it in wet cloth or put oil to polythene cover to spread it with hand and put to pan….

    Comment by rajani (US) — March 15, 2008 @ 2:42 pm

  39. Hi

    i live in UK and love good Indian food. I stumbled across a site yesterday that linked to this and have bought the Sorgam flour and the tava. I hadn’t heard of either beofe and am looking forward to trying it now!

    Comment by tony arnold — August 8, 2008 @ 3:54 pm

  40. Hi Indira,

    I always visit your blog. For making dishes like bobbatlu, paratha(stuffed) or jonna roti, I have a very good tip. Use parchment paper and roll the dough on it, either with your hands or a rolling pin. It will easily come out, or you can invert it right on the tava and pull out the parchment paper.

    Comment by Srilatha — October 3, 2008 @ 11:32 am

  41. What is jowar atta in Tamil? Please let me know.

    Comment by pragathi — June 11, 2009 @ 9:18 pm

  42. Indira, very nice presentstion. My mother-in-law makes such a good jonna rotti,God!! I can’t forger the taste till today. We are Kannada speaking and we used to make them very often.Here in US I did not try so far. I will try it very soon
    Pramada

    Comment by Pramada — July 30, 2009 @ 12:38 pm

  43. This is a classic Telangana dish, I guess even in Rayalseema too. Until Andhra politicians came with rice schemes to promote Andhra farmers. Slowly with cheap rice, and looking down on this dish as Majdoor(labour) roti, This dish has become extinct. North Karnataka, is the place to eat now. They continue the tradition to this day and i hope they continue it and keep this very healthy dish alive.

    Comment by Yadgiri — September 19, 2009 @ 8:59 pm

  44. dear indira, please help me with this do you or anybody know how much cabohydrates does a jawar ki roti have as i have herd that jawar helps controling diabetis does anyone know if its true?please help with this one. thanking you a lot.

    Comment by aarti advani — February 8, 2010 @ 7:23 pm

  45. Hi,

    Any Machine available for making Jowar Roti for bulk requirement?

    Regards
    Sreedevi

    Comment by Sreed — February 24, 2010 @ 5:01 am

  46. its very very good we enjoyed the recipe

    regards surya

    Comment by suryanarayana — July 12, 2010 @ 11:38 am

  47. healhy food

    Comment by puram manikyam gupta — September 27, 2012 @ 8:11 am

  48. Will surely try this as I am in the journey of mastering diabetis management to help my mom.

    Comment by sri — October 8, 2012 @ 3:05 pm

  49. Sorghum roti is very good for people with diabetes, high cholesterol, heart problems, celiac disease, obesity etc. as it is gluten free, so it does not raise the glycemic index of the blood as high as wheat does.
    I have recently started eating this as I have stopped eating wheat. I mix ground flax seed with sorghum. My rotis are not thin, and have lot of cracks, so I am very grateful to come across this site and will try the methods shared here….Pallavi’s and yours Indira. Thank you for sharing.

    Comment by Monica Jain — October 30, 2012 @ 12:00 am

  50. This is awsome about jonna rotte and its one of my favourate dish and ur remaining the next generations about it.Its famous in kadapa and kurnool dists most

    Comment by Kasa sreenivasa Reddy — January 10, 2014 @ 12:25 am

  51. roti maker free home delivery in all pakistan
    contact:0336-6304030 http:/telebrandpk.com/roti-maker

    Comment by roti maker — September 12, 2014 @ 6:44 am

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  53. Indira, presentstion very nice. My mother-in-law makes such a good Jonah rotti, God !! I can not fake taste even today. We Kannada-speaking and we make it very often.Here in the United States I have not tried yet. I will try it very soon
    Pramada

    Comment by shine — April 5, 2015 @ 1:20 pm

  54. ny Machine available for making Jowar Roti for bulk requirement?

    Comment by SamDrivers 15 — May 1, 2015 @ 9:07 am

  55. it’s of great knowledge for the dying Roti
    well im a 2nd year B.Sc. Agri.n Tech. AAIDU; student n im studing presently on jowar n u provide a good exposure

    thanking you

    Comment by roti maker — May 11, 2015 @ 2:21 pm

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  64. Nice to share this post. thanks

    Comment by electronics — April 23, 2016 @ 12:18 pm

  65. I need jonna roti machine price Iam Sudheer warangal where we can buy the Jonna roti machine plz give me contact no or website

    Comment by Sudheer — May 27, 2016 @ 1:36 pm

  66. Hi indira. We Sindhis put fine cut onion,methi leaves Spring garlic(fresh garlic with with green stems like onions) salt,some ghee.then we kneed jower flour with water .crumbling consistency.while making each roti we take enough mixed flour put little water to make little soft dough. Put some dry flour on rolling board then pattern it to make round roti.once we reach desired size we pick the board .slant it on other hand n quickly put roti on tawa.while cooking on first side sprinkle little ghee around roti then slide roti on steel plate.then put roti other side on tawa n cook it just turning it around.againcook the first side apply little ghee.this roti u can eat without any curry also.

    Comment by Usha tejuja — July 28, 2016 @ 8:41 am

  67. Hi indira. We Sindhis put fine cut onion,methi leaves Spring garlic(fresh garlic with with green stems like onions) salt,some ghee.then we kneed jower flour with water .crumbling consistency.while making each roti we take enough mixed flour put little water to make little soft dough. Put some dry flour on rolling board then pattern it to make round roti.once we reach desired size we pick the board .slant it on other hand n quickly put roti on tawa.while cooking on first side sprinkle little ghee around roti then slide roti on steel plate.then put roti other side on tawa n cook it just turning it around.againcook the first side apply little ghee.this roti u can eat without any curry also.

    Comment by Usha tejuja — July 28, 2016 @ 8:41 am

  68. I need jowar roti machine - 9533553848

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  70. In the process of seeking a Placement concern and you are in the process to employ a recruiter or a headhunter to assist you with your search and the terms headhunter and recruiter are often used synonymous and reciprocal, but in general, the terms represent differences in who these individuals work for and how an individual put their efforts and skills in bringing an explication to the current needs.

    Comment by Head Hunters in India — September 23, 2016 @ 4:29 am

  71. I’ve read and watched YouTube videos of ppl making this so perfectly but I just can’t do it 😡 I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong. I wish I could see it first hand made in front of me in person.

    Comment by Zahra Bokhari — September 27, 2016 @ 1:09 am

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