Mahanandi

Living in Consciousness ~ Indi(r)a’s Food and Garden Weblog

Series of Sprouts ~ Black-Eyed Pea Sprouts

Alasanda Molakalu


Black-Eyed Pea Sprouts

These black-eyed peas are from Indian grocery shop (Apna Bazar, Bellevue), and are imported from India like most of the lentils and legumes. Sprouting was easy with these peas. But when I tried the same last week with some American store-bought black-eyed peas, they didn’t sprout. Same thing happened with Adzuki beans.

Are these American peas and beans genetically modified? Why aren’t they coming to life?

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Blackeye Beans, Sprouts (Molakalu) (Sunday August 5, 2007 at 9:40 pm- permalink)

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17 comments for Series of Sprouts ~ Black-Eyed Pea Sprouts »

  1. Hi Indira,

    LAst friday, I made alsandala vada. I left out with some of the lentils and I sprouted it. Yesterday I made gugullu with the sprouted black beans or alasandalu.

    Nice picture though. I never bought any lentils from American store. Here in bay area all the lentils in Indian grocery shop are very cheap comparing to American stores.

    Comment by laxmi — August 5, 2007 @ 10:14 pm

  2. Hey Indira,

    I was told by my aunt who is a Doctor that we should check for any seeds before sprouting if its edible. Following her suggestion I did some research and found that some of the sprouts actually are toxic. Here is a link that has more information on sprouting. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprouting

    Hope it helps!

    Regards,
    Nina

    Comment by Nina — August 5, 2007 @ 10:31 pm

  3. My guess is that the pulses have been irradiated — a standard practice in the US which kills bacteria, but also inhibits sprouting.

    Comment by Another Nina — August 6, 2007 @ 1:55 am

  4. Are you on a sprouting spree??? :) I loved that photo..specially the vessel which holds the sprouts!

    Comment by Madhuli — August 6, 2007 @ 2:40 am

  5. Hi,

    I tried to sprout alasandalu but they didn’t. They started smelling badly!! and started sticking to each other.

    Can you tell me what went wrong?

    Thanks
    Sushama

    Comment by Sushama — August 6, 2007 @ 5:31 am

  6. Hi,
    I love ur website and follow quite regularly.
    I think, what ‘Nina’ said is correct, the pulses are irradiated. When we tried with Moongdal,(when we were visiting our daughter in CA,)we had the same problem. For the other comment on ’sticking and smelling’, the reason probably is that after soaking, the water is not drained fully. Try putting the soaked pulses in a cloth to keep them dry.
    ERM, Vizag.

    Comment by ERMurthy — August 6, 2007 @ 8:26 am

  7. Guggullu and vada too? You are tempting me Laxmi. I love alasanda vadalu very much.

    Nina: Thanks for posting this informative link about sprouts here.
    Black-eyed beans are one of the beans we sprout regularly here and at Nandyala. They are safe to consume and also taste better than the non-sprouted plain beans.

    AN: That explains the lack of life. Thanks.
    I am aware that they irradiate meat and some vegetables. Poor beans!

    Madhuli: just once a week. about two cups of beans, that’s all. Trying to gain some Vit B.:)

    Hi Sushama: Like ER Murthy mentioned, proper water drainage and also well ventilated area are essential for healthy sprouting process.

    ER Murthy: Thanks for the helpful tip.

    Comment by Indira — August 6, 2007 @ 2:44 pm

  8. I think my pinto beans must have been irradiated too …they got sticky and smelly inspite of being well drained…refused to grow! The beans I buy from the bulk bins in health-food stores seem to do fine though..i guess they’re spared the third degree….

    Comment by aa — August 6, 2007 @ 4:00 pm

  9. I had same problem with my wal mart bought black eyed peas. After three days, they sprouted a little. By the time,they were smelling so horrible, I had to throw them in garbage.

    Comment by Suma Gandlur — August 7, 2007 @ 10:36 am

  10. I love the pictures you take!! Which camera do you use? by the results seems like it is one of the expensive SLRs. Please do share. Thanks

    Comment by Kavita — August 9, 2007 @ 10:05 am

  11. Indira, They are most probably genetically modified - to increase production and reduce the pests.. but here, unlike monsanto, that is not what is causing the un-sprouting!

    I think you’ve got your answer above - the irradiation is the usual cause. Other factors like too much exposure to light in those stores and also the time it took from packing the beans till it reaches our homes - god knows how long it’s been sitting on which warehouse and the shelves at the markets.

    I followed one of the beans-discussion in a group I used to hang out and the above is what I learned from it.. Also a suggestion from the same discussion - Ethnic beans or any other ethnic spices? Then buy from an ethnic market where it moves very fast. :)

    Comment by Kay — August 9, 2007 @ 11:43 am

  12. Have you a receipe for the black eyed beans when they are sprouted? They sprout fine in France

    Comment by Mike Spain — September 17, 2007 @ 1:36 am

  13. I have a receipe for horsegram sprouts that is popular in Karnataka,India…..where do i share it ?

    Comment by Suman Bharat — February 6, 2008 @ 3:06 am

  14. I tried to sprout chick peas and black eyed pes,but they never sprout i tried my best to keep up with them by rinsing regularly still no luck and i got them from indian store,

    i tried second time also thinking i might have made a mistake not rinsing properly but same sitution very sticky and smell,i guess they are not imported from india

    Comment by Yashwini — May 31, 2008 @ 2:03 pm

  15. wow, one thread… so much helpful information.

    i am new to sprouting and tried some organic black eyed peas. they didn’t sprout. i think it may be that my beans were from a supermarket and had been sitting in my cupboard too long :)

    i will be going to the local natural food store to ask some questons and buy some beans from them!

    Comment by goodnessbaker — August 8, 2010 @ 9:16 am

  16. Thank you so much for these comments; I have researched irradiated foods over the past year since Fukushima raised awareness of radiation problems in our foods, and this explains why my dried black eyed peas (a favorite, especially now so close to New Year’s) do not sprout and get smelly (and it pains me to throw them out; such a waste. Originally I am from the southern US, but now live in Canada, so I am almost certain that all black eyed peas available in stores here (and I’ve tried sprouting both regular packaged dried blackeyed peas and those labeled “organic”) have been grown in the south and imported, therefore irradiated for “safety”…(sigh)…. If anyone has any black eyed pea growing experience and tips for northern climates I am all ears and would be very appreciative for any growing tips, as it appears this will be the only way to get black eyed peas to sprout here. I grew tomatoes successfully in a greenhouse, but am wondering if anyone has had any success with growing black eyed peas in the north and could share any insights. Happy 2012! (will be celebrating with a pot of black eyed peas, unfortunately, not sprouted though!).

    Comment by Gage Tarrant — December 30, 2011 @ 9:27 pm

  17. I have yet to have any issues with sprouting supermarket legumes, none have been organic but I do avoid any old looking packages and the bottom of the barrel for bulk. I have also used organic legumes from Whole Foods and got a some what better yield at a much higher cost. Be sure to rinse them well and soak in clean water (I use filtered water from my RO unit) for about 12 hours. Drain and replace the water after about 6 to 8 hours. Then I put a dampened kitchen towel on a tray, spread the legumes on the towel and cover with another dampened kitchen towel. Then I put in the oven after tagging the switch to not turn on the oven before removing the sprouts! Sprinkle water on the towel every 8 hours, but do not use so much water that the beans are sitting in water, they should just be in a damp environment. Depending on the type of legume my sprouts are ready in 36 to 48 hours.

    Comment by Howie — July 1, 2015 @ 3:02 pm

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