Mahanandi

Living in Consciousness ~ Indi(r)a’s Food and Garden Weblog

Parval ~ a Pictorial

Parval
Pretty and Pleasing ~ Parval


Sliced Parval


Parval Cooked to Crisp with Curry Leaves and Garlic

Parval is a beautiful looking vegetable, popular throughout north-India and little seen elsewhere. They are used especially in curry and stews. It has a satisfying soul which makes a filling curry that lifts the spirit. They are little bit hard to find in the United States even at Indian grocery shops, but they are well worth the hunt!

Recipe:

15 to 20 fresh parvals
1 tablespoon peanut oil
10 fresh curry leaves
5 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced lengthwise
Pinch each- cumin and mustard seeds
¼ teaspoon turmeric
½ teaspoon red chilli flakes and salt, or to taste

Rinse parvals under water. Dry them with a kitchen or paper towel. Make a vertical cut in the middle. Then slice each half again into four thin pieces lengthwise.

In a wide skillet, heat peanut oil. Add and toast garlic and curry leaves to pale gold. Next goes the cumin and mustard seeds. When mustard seeds start to pop, add the parval pieces. Mix and cover the skillet. Cook on medium heat for about five to ten minutes. Covering the skillet creates steamy environment that helps to soften the parval. When they start to get tender, remove the lid. Sprinkle turmeric, red chilli flakes and salt. Toss gently and cook for another five minutes, until the parval turn to crisp like shown in the photo above.

Serve right away. Enjoy with rice and dal, or with chapati or dal.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Vegetables, Parval (Wednesday October 31, 2007 at 9:55 pm- permalink)
Comments (24)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Chole with Punjabi Tinda

The mere mention of chole, the famous Punjabi recipe with chickpeas, elicits feelings of comfort and good eats. Bring in the Punjabi tinda, the chole becomes extra special.

The food I prepared today inspired by two Punjabi specialties “chole with Punjabi tinda” turned out to be excellent. Along with Punjabi tinda, I also added tomatoes and potatoes to chickpea chole. Few teaspoons of kasuri methi livened up the chole with wonderful aroma.

A harmonious, energizing and filling meal!

Punjabi Tinda, Tomato, Cooked Chickpeas
Tomato, Punjabi Tinda, Cooked Chickpeas

Recipe:
(for two, for two meals)

1 tablespoon - ghee
1 onion- finely chopped
4 tomatoes - finely chopped
1 Punjabi tinda – Peeled and the white flesh cut to cubes
1 potato - peeled and cut to cubes
3 cups chickpeas (cooked to tender)
(Separate ½- cup chickpeas and puree to smooth. Added to thicken the chole)
1 tablespoon - chana masala powder (homemade or store-bought)
Chilli powder, salt, and lemon juice - to taste
1 tablespoon - kasuri methi

Heat ghee in a big pot.
Add onions and tomatoes. Saute to soft mush.
Add Punjabi tinda and potatoes. Saute to tender.
Stir in chickpeas, the chickpea paste, chana masala and chilli powders, and salt.
Add about one cup of water. Combine. Simmer, covered for about 15 to 20 min.
At the end, sprinkle the kasuri methi and lemon juice.
Mix and serve right away. Great with chapati/roti and rice.


Chole with Punjabi Tinda, Dahi Mirchi, Roti, and Persimmon with yogurt ~ Meal Today

Notes:
Punjabi tinda is a small variety squash native to North India and prized for its pleasant taste.
Features: green skin and white colored flesh, firm texture, mildly sweet taste, size about an apple.
Available at local Indian grocery shops during Oct-Nov(seasonal), and also frozen and in tins.
Kasuri Methi = Sun-dried fenugreek leaves

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Chickpeas, Indian Vegetables, Punjabi Tinda (Tuesday October 30, 2007 at 1:40 pm- permalink)
Comments (16)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Dazzling Dals ~ Punjabi Tinda Dal

Punjabi Tinda

Pretty looking Punjabi Tinda is a type of winter squash, common to north India. This is a seasonal vegetable and available at Indian grocery shops - fresh, frozen and also preserved in brine, in ready to use tins. Punjabi Tinda is easy to recognize. Pleasant pale-green color and perfect round shape, they resemble green tomato or green apple in color, shape and size. The skin is tough though, needs peeling, or scrubbing. When cut open, you see firm flesh in snow-white color, and seeds will be in white or brown color depending on the maturity of the gourd. Punjabi Tinda can be steamed, stuffed, or stir-fried. It has sweet taste with a light papaya scent. Absorbs flavors well and tastes superb in strong-sauced curries and with dals.

Punjabi tinda was introduced to me by Deviji, the kind neighbor we had when we lived in Pittsburgh. She is about my mother’s age and came to Pittsburgh to visit her son. She stayed for about six months. We struck a friendship through our interest in cookery. She couldn’t get enough of my idly, dosas and I of her traditional Punjabi cooking. Together, we would prepare an elaborate meal combining both south and north Indian dishes, have a nice lunch and save the rest for dinner. She is a military wife, traveled all over India with her husband. She is like Annapoorna and Saraswathi when it comes to food and knowledge. I learned so much from her about ingredients and techniques that were new to me. There is nothing that compares to first hand learning that comes through the interaction with an experienced person. This rich experience started with just a “hallway hello”. And that was the best experience I ever gotten for a friendly hello.

The following recipe is from Deviji. Punjabi Tinda cooked with toor dal and seasoned with tomato, onion and tamarind. A very good dal!

Punjabi Tinda
Punjabi Tinda ~ Whole, Halved and Cut to Chunks

Recipe:

¾ cup toor dal
1 Punjabi tinda, peeled and cut to big chunks
Tomato and onion, one each and 6 green chillies, cut to chunks
Tamarind pulp - two teaspoons or to taste
Turmeric and Salt - to taste or quarter teaspoon each
Popu or tadka ingredients

Take toor dal and two cups of water in a pressure-cooker.
Cook to soft, and then mash the dal to smooth. Keep aside.

In a pot, heat oil and do the popu(toast cumin, mustard and curry leaves in oil).
Add Punjabi tinda, tomato, onion and chillies to toasted popu. Saute to tender.
Stir in tamarind, salt and turmeric.
Add the cooked toor dal and about one cup of water.
Simmer for about ten to fifteen minutes.
Serve or spoon into a small bowl and enjoy with rice or chapatis.

Dal Prepared with Punjabi Tinda
Punjabi Tinda Dal with Rice and Sliced Pears ~ Light Lunch Today

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Vegetables, Punjabi Tinda (Monday October 29, 2007 at 1:47 pm- permalink)
Comments (12)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Punjabi Tinda, Parval and Tindora

Punajbi Tinda, Parval and Tindora
Punjabi Tinda, Parval and Tindora (from Lt to Rt)
Fresh Vegetables of India ~ for This Week’s Indian Kitchen

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Vegetables, Dondakaya(Tindora), Indian Ingredients, Indian Kitchen (Sunday October 28, 2007 at 1:35 pm- permalink)
Comments (11)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Weekend Music



Emi Setura Linga ~ by Sri. Bala Murali Krishna

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Saturday October 27, 2007 at 2:46 am- permalink)
Comments (8)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Raffle Results : FAHC~Subscribe to Smiles

Your passionate response to the “FAHC-Subscribe to Smiles fund-drive” is clearly indicative that all of us are determined to make a positive difference in the world. By being calmly active and actively calm, the encouragement, confidence and support you showed is heartwarming. It is truly an honor to receive such a response. I believe that we are helping ourselves, for a better tomorrow, by helping our future generations.

My thanks to the fellow bloggers and friends, who believed in this effort and readily donated time and offered amazing prizes:

Vijay K Narayanan, Anjali, Bee&Jai, Manisha, Padmaja, Shilpa, Mythili, Siri, Richa, Madhuli and Maria.

Special thanks to author and chef Suvir Saran and to Shruthi Reddy for their compassion, generous contribution and prize offers. It is a blessing to have such kind-hearted friends. I am also grateful to all who have written about this event and spread the word.

I sincerely thank all individual donors on behalf of fundraising team for the contributions. You are the people who made the goal accomplished. Your encouragement gave the FAHC team a great positive push to keep working continuously towards this mission. Thank you again for your generosity, which will make it possible for many children to have a quality life. You can find more details about the FAHC campaign, and the benefiting children at feedahungrychild.org.

For raffle-draw, I had taken the help of my friend’s daughter, three year old Manasa, to randomly pick the winners. For each prize, we have written down all the names and placed the folded paper slips in a jar. A vigorous shake and a pick. One prize at a time, the raffle-draw turned out to be a pleasant affair, all thanks to little cutie pie Manasa.

From Manasa’s hands, here are the raffle results:


FAHC Subscribe to Smiles: Raffle Fund-Drive Results
(Goal= $3,360, Duration= 9 days, Donors= 109, Money Raised = $4,735)
Prize
Went to
1. Grains, Greens, and Grated Coconuts
(14 raffle tickets)
Kala Narayan
2. Supreme Spice Gift Box
(11 raffle tickets)
Priya Ramamurthy
3. Complete Digital Photography (Two copies)
(10 raffle tickets)
Krithika Sukumaran
Padmaja Kochera
4. American Masala (Two Copies)
(15 raffle tickets)
Linda
Shruthi Reddy
5. Indian Home Cooking (Two Copies)
(8 raffle tickets)
A B
Archana Bhat
6. Dinner for two at Devi (Two Prizes)
(1 raffle ticket)
Suganthi
7. Children’s Saree Dress (Two Prizes)
(2 raffle tickets)
Megha Abburu
Deepika Gadiparthi
8. Fair-trade Goodies Bag (Two Prizes)
(4 raffle tickets)
Swati Thorat
Ashwini of Food for Thought
9. Mountain Valley~ Oil on Canvas
(7 raffle tickets)
Chandrarekha
10. Ceramic Vindu Plate
(4 raffle tickets)
Vasantha Vemula (Rohini)
11. 30-Minute Meals
(1 raffle ticket)
Chandana Pandrangi
12. Dark Chocolate Made with Icewine
(3 raffle tickets)
Lee and Friends
13. Cooking at Home with Pedatha
(12 raffle tickets)
M M
14. Dakshin
(2 raffle tickets)
Gururajan
15. Essential Andhra Cookbook
(7 raffle tickets)
Dee and K
16. World Vegetarian
(4 raffle tickets)
Ranjini Rajeevan
17. Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cooking
(1 raffle ticket)
Spandana and Jagadish
18. The Red Chilli
(1 raffle ticket)
Sreelu of Tasty Travels

All the winners will be notified via Email. The winners have to provide and confirm their shipping addresses. The prize sponsors will then send the gifts directly to the winners. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for the prizes to reach you. Thank you.

Questions, concerns? Please contact me at donatesmiles@gmail.com.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Thursday October 25, 2007 at 12:07 am- permalink)
Comments (35)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Bhakthi ~ Bhukthi: on Vijayadasami

Dasara Exchange
Dasara Exchange

Neivedyam on Vijayadasami
Dasara Neivedyam
Chanadal Payasam, Bajjis, Potato Curry, Tomato Pappu, Chitrannam and Sona Masuri Rice with Ghee

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Sunday October 21, 2007 at 6:16 pm- permalink)
Comments (23)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

VijayaDasami Greetings!

Dasara Thambulam
Festival Day Thambulam

To Dear Family, Friends and Fellow Bloggers:

Dasara Subhakankshalu!

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Saturday October 20, 2007 at 1:13 pm- permalink)
Comments (22)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Subscribe to Smiles ~ A Fund-drive for FAHC From October 15 - 23

In many countries, particularly in rural areas, the people’s resources are very less and so are their needs. The lack of resources and parents’ inability to earn money always affects the little ones in the family. Due to this, children do not get food to eat, do not have proper education or are forced to go to work at a very young age. What I have also noticed is, a very little amount of money could bring a tremendous change in a child’s and in a family’s life. For example, the money we’d usually spend on one meal in a restaurant (about US$25) could feed an entire family for several days in India. Not having a meal in a restaurant will not make any difference in our lives, but having proper food for several days in a month would definitely bring great change in a family in need.

We all might have recognized this fact and have thought about it at some point of time, but we could not do anything directly. Individually we would not be able bring a sustainable change, but collectively we could. This is what exactly FAHC is trying to do - mobilizing similarly thinking people to contribute small amounts of money and make it use where it is greatly needed. What greater cause is there in this world than giving proper food, clothing and reading materials to a needy child?

FAHC Logo

FAHC is a non-profit organization. Started by Vijay K Narayanan, a fellow food blogger from India. Here is how FAHC is making a difference:

FAHC began its pilot operation of feeding program on April 17, 2007, at Palakkad district of Kerala in India. The event was a full-day affair involving all the FAHC-supported children, their caretakers, and a few well-wishers from the neighborhood. We gathered at the chairperson’s house where we organized a lunch with children followed by the distribution of the first monthly feeding kits and gifts. The program was implemented correctly for well-identified 10 families to support a total of 14 children in the pilot feeding project. Our visits to their houses were so inspiring; at times we literally had tears in our eyes seeing their tragic living conditions. They have very meager support systems and have no fathers. Some of them do not have both parents. The children face so many hurdles that it becomes even more important to lend them a helping hand early in life. Now they have a hope. FAHC is aiming to make a tangible difference in the lives of these chosen children.

FAHC will provide support to the children and their families by providing better food via feeding kits, education, healthcare, and welfare.

Educationally, FAHC will henceforth take care of the costs of their textbooks, notebooks, school bag, umbrella, uniforms, school fees, tuition fees, etc. We will also conduct study classes, camps, and games during vacation holidays for the children.”

To generate funds for this effort, FAHC has set forth a modest goal of raising 3,360 dollars. I am keen on this cause and together with fellow food bloggers, we have come up with few exciting prizes for a raffle fundraiser. I thank Anjali, Bee and Jai, and Suvir Saran for their support, effort and contributions.

The following prizes make great gifts, and each item will be sent to the raffle winner neatly packed and shipping expenses paid.

I strongly believe that the money we generate through this raffle fund-raising goes towards feeding at least few hungry mouths. Please see if you would be able to contribute by bidding on the items of your choice. Thank you!

The List of Raffle Prizes

1. Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts ~ by Ammini Ramachandran
(from Me)

“Grains, Greens, and Grated Coconuts is more than a cookbook-it is a collection of treasured memories and delicious family recipes presented against a backdrop of Indian culinary and cultural history. Familiar with Western cooking methods, Ramachandran shows how to integrate these recipes into a Western-style menu and suggests ways for home cooks to expand their repertoire without having to create an entire menu of dishes.”
Ammini Ramachandran’s website: Peppertrail.com
Reviews at Amazon.com

2. A Gift Box of Spice Extracts
(From Anjali Damerla of Supreme Spice)


With winter season upon us, the refreshing and powerful spice extracts offer a neat and easy way to boost the immune system. Also make a great addition to tea, coffee and sweet/savory recipes. The raffle winner will get gift box of 5-spice extracts:

Cardamom, Ginger, Kesar Milk masala, Tea Masala and Tulsi spice.

3. Complete Digital Photography ~ by Ben Long .
From Bee and Jai of Jugalbandi. (Two copies. Raffle winners get one copy each.)

Complete Digital Photography

“Complete Digital Photography has become a classic book for helping traditional photographers move to digital! It’s also the book of choice for many new digital photographers who want to learn how to take great digital photos. Now in its 4th edition, this bestseller has been fine-tuned and updated to provide the most current information available.”
Reviews at: Amazon.com

4. American Masala ~ by Suvir Saran
Autographed and shipped directly by the acclaimed chef and author Sri. Suvir Saran. (Two copies. Raffle winners will get one copy each.)

American Masala

“Suvir Saran’s American Masala is an exciting addition to American cooking. These recipes are simple without being simplistic and bring the vibrant traditions of Indian seasoning and spice to the increasingly diverse American repertoire. Perhaps most important, this book is filled with Saran’s huge and generous spirit.” - Michael Ruhlman, Author, The Soul of a Chef
Reviews at: Amazon.com

5. Indian Home Cooking ~ by Suvir Saran
Autographed and shipped directly by chef and author Sri. Suvir Saran.
(Two copies. Raffle winners will get one copy each.)

Indian Home Cooking

Indian Home Cooking is a celebration of the food Indians cook in American kitchens today, using ingredients found in most supermarkets. Filled with gorgeous photographs, fresh flavors, and practical advice, Indian Home Cooking is an illuminating guide to real Indian food. From slow-simmered curries with layered flavors to quickly sautéed dishes, these approachable recipes explore the wide world of Indian cuisine.”
Reviews at: Amazon.com

6. Dinner for Two, at Elegant “Dévi” Restaurant, New York City
Two Prizes and wine included. Generously contributed by owner and chef Sri. Suvir Saran.

Sri. Suvir Saran Devi Restaurant
NY Times on Devi
Location: 8 East 18th Street between 5th Ave and Broadway, New York City (Google Map)

(You can find detailed information about raffle prizes 3 to 6 at Jugalbandi.)

7. Two ready-to-wear children’s sarees with matching blouses
From Manisha of Indian Food Rocks

Children's Saree Dress with Matching Blouse in Red Children's Saree Dress with Matching Blouse in Green

In beautiful red-green colors with rich jari borders, these two brand-new, traditonal outfits for girls make a perfect wear for festival day celebrations. Size 28(Children’s), fits a 5/6 year old girl of average height.
Details and Photos at Indian Food Rocks.

8. Two Fair-Trade Goodies Bags from UK
From Padmaja of Spicy Andhra
Raffle winner will get a gift bag each.

Fair-Trade Goodies Bag from UK

Goodies Bag contains Fairtrade Products:

Christmas Rich Roast Coffee, Pure Origin Kenyan Teabags (80 teabags), Lemon Curd, Strawberry and Pink Champagne Conserve, Chilean Clear Honey, Organic Milk Chocolate Bar, Organic Dark Chocolate Bar, Organic Milk Chocolate With Roasted Almonds Bar

Details and photos at Spicy Andhra.

9. Mountain Valley - Oil on Canvas Painting (16 X 20)
From Shilpa of Aayi’s Recipes

Oil on Canvas, an Original Art Work by Shilpa
Spectacular yet so serene, this oil on canvas is an original art work by talented artist Srimati. Shilpa. Details and photos at Aayi’s Recipes.

10. A Personalized Ceramic “Vindu” Plate
From Mythili of Vindu

Vindu Ceramic Plate
In traditional village art style or customized to your liking, from creative ceramic artist Mythili. Details and photos at Vindu

11. 30-Minute Meals ~ by Rachel Ray
From Siri of Siri’s Corner


Who can resist the allure of 30-minute meals?
Read Reviews at - Amazon. Prize details at Siri’s Corner

12. Dark Chocolate Made With Icewine
From Richa of As Dear As Salt

Dark Chocolate Made With Icewine

Rare kind of chocolate in which grapes are naturally frozen on the vine in Canada’s frigid winters and then harvested and pressed. The wine from the juice adds a luxurious flavor and this dark chocolate is a speciality from Canada.
Details and Photos at As Dear As Salt.

13. Cooking at Home with Pedatha by Jigyasa Giri, Pratibha Jain
From Shruthi, a Friend of Mahanandi

Front Cover of Cookbook ~ Cooking at home with Pedatha

“Rendered in stunning aesthetics, here is a traditional fare from Andhra Pradesh, the rice-bowl of India which boasts of one of the sweetest of languages and spiciest of foods. Fluffy, steaming rice with spicy chutneys, piquant powders, wholesome dals and mouth-watering vegetables. In easy-to-do-steps, learn these traditional vegetarian recipes as taught by an 85-year-young grandmother.”
Authors website: http://www.pritya.com/index.html
Reviews at: Amazon.com

14. Dakshin: Vegetarian Cuisine from South India by Chandra Padmanabhan
From Shruthi, a Friend of Mahanandi

Dakshin: Vegetarian Cuisine from South India by Chandra Padmanabhan

“Dakshin” is an ancient Sanskrit word meaning “south.” It symbolizes what this Cookingbook is all about - the best and most delicious of South Indian vegetarian cuisine. Filled with tempting recipes and evocative photographs, Dakshin takes you through the elements of South Indian meals, including chutneys and pickles, rice dishes, pakoras, payasams, poriyals, kootus, bondas, and vadais. With its use of fresh produce and a Healthy, balanced approach to eating, Dakshin is an ideal Cookingbook for today’s lifestyle.”
Reviews at: Amazon

15. Essential Andhra Cookbook with Hyderbadi & Telangana Specialities ~ by Latif I Bilkees
From Shruthi, a Friend of Mahanandi

Essential Andhra Cookbook with Hyderbadi & Telangana Specialities ~ by Latif I Bilkees

This book includes more than 200 recipes from Andhra, one of India’s largest and culturally most diverse state. Along with the recipes the author recounts the traditions and rituals associated with food such as the right order in which to serve the dishes. While Hyderabadi cuisine with its distinctive Mughlai flavor is famous around the world, food from the other parts of Andhra, one of India’s largest and culturally most diverse states, remains relatively unknown. In this edition, the author brings together for the first time the different tastes of Andhra cooking from the humble Idli-sambhar to spicy seafood delicacies.

16. Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian
From Shruthi, a Friend of Mahanandi

Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian

“In her most comprehensive volume yet, Madhur Jaffrey draws on more than four decades of culinary adventures, travels, and experimentation for a diverse collection that both intrigues and delights the palate. Dishes from five continents touch on virtually all the world’s best loved flavors, for a unsurpassed selection of vegetarian fare. More than 650 recipes exemplify Madhur’s unsurpassed ability to create simple, flavorful homecooking that is well within the reach of every cook.”
Reviews at: Amazon

17. Indian Cooking ~ by Madhur Jaffrey
From Maria, a Foodie + Techie Friend

Indian Cooking ~ by Madhur Jaffrey

“One of the world’s foremost authorities on Indian cooking presents more than 100 authentic yet surprisinghly simple recipes for the best-loved delicacies of India. There are helpful chapters on equipment, techniques, seasonings, and menu planning as well. Color photographs.”
Reviews at Amazon.com

18. One Year Subscription to “The Red Chilli”
at www.sanjeevkapoor.com

From Madhuli of My Food Court

The Red Chilli ~ Online Food Magazine

With “The Red Chilli” online food magazine subscription, you can access more than 1000 recipes, besides many other sections at beloved celebrity chef Sanjeev Kapoor’s website. A culinary treat to any food lover.
Details at My Food Court

———–

How to Contribute:

Click on Chip-in. (It takes few seconds to load.)

Contribute: Via Paypal or credit. You can donate any amount. Each $25 donation will give you one raffle ticket towards a prize of your choice.

After you donate, please forward your payment confirmation message to donatesmiles@gmail.com, clearly specifying which prize you are interested in. Do mention how many tickets per prize, for example, a donation of $50 will buy you 2 raffle tickets for a cookbook.

For all correspondence by email, please use the same email address that you have used for your Chip-in contribution. This helps us validate your entry to the raffle and to contact you should you win a prize.

The event will close on 23rd October and raffle prize winners will be announced on 25th here at Mahanandi and at respective blogs. (The drawing will be done manually).

If you need more information about the prizes, please contact me using the comments form below or mail me at donatesmiles@gmail.com.

Cynicism may be cool, but compassion always rocks. Make a rocking choice!

Thank you.

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Fund Drive Supporters
Name Contribution Raffle
Singari Vijay $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Srivalli Jetti $ 25 Indian Home Cooking
Linda $ 25 American Masala
Manisha Pandit $ 25 American Masala
Shilpa $ 25 Complete Digital Photography
Padmaja Kochera $ 25 Complete Digital Photography
Sharmi Komali $ 25 Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Siri at Siri’s Corner $ 25 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Mythili & N of Vindu $ 50 2 for Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Ashwini Gopinath $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Madhuri Annam $ 25 Ceramic “Vindu” Plate
Shruthi Reddy $ 1,000 5 for American Masala
5 for Indian Home Cooking
Sunita Bhuyan $ 25 Complete Digital Photography
Swarna Turaka $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Ashwini of Food for Thought $ 101 2 for Fair-Trade Goodies Bag
2 for Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Mandira of Ahaar $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Anitha Medichetti $ 50
Jyostana Bhatt $ 20
Sangeeta Dhawan $ 100
Vijayakumar Narayanan $ 50
Sridhar Kudaravalli $ 15
Archana Bhat $ 30 Indian Home Cooking
Manikandan Subramanian $ 101
Madhavi Kadaba
(Madhu’s Vantalu)
$ 30 Essential Andhra Cookbook
Anonymous(per request) $ 25
John Darnielle $ 30
Sigma Sreedharan $ 25 American Masala
Madhuli(My Food Court) $ 50 1 for Complete Digital Photography
1 for Mountain Valley
Indhu Balasubramaniam $ 25
Roopa Anantharamu $ 10
Amanda Waddell $ 25
Laavanya Dheenadayalan $ 30 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Priya Ramamurthy $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Balaji Srinivasan $ 100
Ramya Panchangam $ 25
Happy Birthday Megha Abburu!
(Snackorama)
$ 50 1 for Children’s Saree Dress
1 for Complete Digital Photography
Sowmya $ 25 Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Aarthi Thoppae $ 25 Mountain Valley, Oil on Canvas
Sasi Bannuru $ 10
Chandrarekha $ 75 2 for Mountain Valley
1 for Ceramic Plate with “VUYYURUS” written on it
Rajitha(Hunger Pangs) $ 25 Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Mohtashim Shaikh $ 25
Vasantha Vemula
(Rohini)
$ 50 1 for Supreme Spice Gift Box
1 for Ceramic Plate with “Vemulavari Vindu” written on it
Sonal Tailor $ 25 Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Chandana Pandrangi $ 25 30-Minute Meals
Sia & Krish
(Monsoon Spice)
$ 25 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Ranjini Rajeevan $ 25 World Vegetarian
Kavitha Guruswamy $ 50 1 for Complete Digital Photography
1 for Mountain Valley
Krithika Sukumaran $ 50 2 for Complete Digital Photography
Radhika Bhandarkar $ 50 2 for G, G and Grated Coconuts
Kala Narayan $ 50 1 for G, G and Grated Coconuts
1 for Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Sarvani K Akkanapragada $ 25 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Dee and K $ 50 2 for Essential Andhra Cookbook
Suneetha Yerneni $ 25
Madhuri $ 25 Essential Andhra Cookbook
Shobana $ 25 Ceramic Vindu Plate
Madhavi Penmetcha $ 25 Complete Digital Photography
Sreelu of Sreelus Tasty Travels $ 50 1 for G, G and Grated Coconuts
1 for The Red Chilli
Karuna $ 20 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Hemantkumar Naik $ 25 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
A B $ 51 1 for Indian Home Cooking
1 for American Masala
Spandana&Jagadish
(Cinnamon Trail)
$ 50 1 for Madhur’s Indian Cooking
1 for Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Deepa Gumpeni $ 25 Icewine Dark Chocolate
Bhargavi Karri
Thank you my friend!
$ 25 Mountain Valley
Gururajan $ 50 1 for Dakshin
1 for Supreme Spice Gift Box
Sujatha Narayan $ 25 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Yeggi Easwaran $ 25 Grains, Greens and Grated Coconuts
Anjali Damerla $ 25 Icewine Dark Chocolate
Mitesh Damana $ 20
Srivats Hariharan $ 35
Lisa Johnson $ 10
Akhila Rajan $ 25
Suyog Kulkarni $ 11
Madhu $ 25 World Vegetarian
Rachna Madhavan
(Soul Food)
$ 25 Complete Digital Photography
Sandeepa
(Bong Mom’s Cookbook)
$ 15
Amaravathy $ 25 Mountain Valley
Suganthi $ 25 Dinner at Devi Restaurant
Swapna and Prasad $ 15
Seema Vasagiri $ 25 Cooking at home with Pedatha
Lee and Friends $ 75 2 for American Masala
1 for Icewine Dark Chocolate
Shoba Prabhakaran $ 25 Essential Andhra Cookbook
Anu Chandrasekhar $ 11
Priya Sivaraman $ 25 American Masala
Charu Menon $ 25 American Masala
Asha Arvind
(Foodie’s Hope)
$ 30
T D $ 25 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Deepika Gadiparthi $ 25 Children’s Saree Dress
Sudhir Padmaja $ 50 Cooking at Home with Pedatha
Mini Narayanan $ 25 Dakshin
Shub $ 30 Supreme Spice Gift Box
Sunanda Gudi $ 25 Essential Andhra Cookbook
Aditya $ 50 2 for American Masala
Vijay Jayabalan $ 25 Essential Andhra Cookbook
Swati Thorat $ 25 Fairtrade Goodies Bag
M M $ 180 3 for Cooking at Home with Pedatha
-2 for World Vegetarian
-1 for G, G and Grated Coconuts
-1 for the Fairtrade Goodies Bag
PK Mohan $ 30
Madhu Kolla $ 10
Nalini Tamanna $ 10
Veera Mylapore $ 15
Pratibha Bhagwat $ 15
Kavitha Mangalagiri $ 180
V K $ 25
Menu Today $ 50
Senthil $ 10
Venugopal Rao $ 10
Mrugesh Desai $ 25
Aruna Gollamudi $ 25
Ulle Koolmar $ 50
Donors to Date = 109 $ 4,735 Thank you!
Raffle Results on Oct 25

Update on October 18th, 2007:

Thanks to your generous contributions and goodwill shown towards “FAHC-Subscribe to Smiles”, we have reached the fund-drive goal of raising 3,360 dollars in a short time. Great achievement I must say. My sincere thanks to all the contributors!

This event will continue until Oct 23, 2007. All funds received from now on are bonus achievements for the “Feedahungrychild.org (FAHC)”. Thanks again for your generous support!

Note:
For full financial details about this fund-raising, please visit “Feedahungrychild.org (FAHC)” after October 23rd.

Update on October 23rd, 2007:

Thank you for your support! The “FAHC-Subscribe to Smiles” Raffle Fund-Raising has successfully concluded. Raffle results will be announced on Thursday, October 25th.

Update on October 25th, 07: Raffle Results

Your passionate response to the “FAHC-Subscribe to Smiles fund-drive” is clearly indicative that all of us are determined to make a positive difference in the world. By being calmly active and actively calm, the encouragement, confidence and support you showed is heartwarming. It is truly an honor to receive such a response. I believe that we are helping ourselves, for a better tomorrow, by helping our future generations.

My thanks to the fellow bloggers and friends, who believed in this effort and readily donated time and offered amazing prizes:

Vijay K Narayanan, Anjali, Bee&Jai, Manisha, Padmaja, Shilpa, Mythili, Siri, Richa, Madhuli and Maria.

Special thanks to author and chef Suvir Saran and to Shruthi Reddy for their compassion, generous contribution and prize offers. It is a blessing to have such kind-hearted friends. I am also grateful to all who have written about this event and spread the word.

I sincerely thank all individual donors on behalf of fundraising team for their contributions. You are the people who made the goal accomplished. Your encouragement gave the FAHC team a great positive push to keep working continuously towards this mission. Thank you again for your generosity, which will make it possible for many children to have a quality life. You can find more details about the FAHC campaign, and the benefiting children at feedahungrychild.org.

For raffle-draw, I had taken the help of my friend’s daughter, three year old Manasa, to randomly pick the winners. For each prize, we have written down all the names and placed the folded paper slips in a jar. A vigorous shake and a pick. One prize at a time, the raffle-draw turned out to be a pleasant affair, all thanks to little cutie pie Manasa.

From Manasa’s hands, here are the raffle results:


FAHC Subscribe to Smiles: Raffle Fund-Drive Results
(Goal= $3,360, Duration= 9 days, Donors= 109, Money Raised = $4,735)
Prize
Went to
1. Grains, Greens, and Grated Coconuts
(14 raffle tickets)
Kala Narayan
2. Supreme Spice Gift Box
(11 raffle tickets)
Priya Ramamurthy
3. Complete Digital Photography (Two copies)
(10 raffle tickets)
Krithika Sukumaran
Padmaja Kochera
4. American Masala (Two Copies)
(15 raffle tickets)
Linda
Shruthi Reddy
5. Indian Home Cooking (Two Copies)
(8 raffle tickets)
A B
Archana Bhat
6. Dinner for two at Devi (Two Prizes)
(1 raffle ticket)
Suganthi
7. Children’s Saree Dress (Two Prizes)
(2 raffle tickets)
Megha Abburu
Deepika Gadiparthi
8. Fair-trade Goodies Bag (Two Prizes)
(4 raffle tickets)
Swati Thorat
Ashwini of Food for Thought
9. Mountain Valley~ Oil on Canvas
(7 raffle tickets)
Chandrarekha
10. Ceramic Vindu Plate
(4 raffle tickets)
Vasantha Vemula (Rohini)
11. 30-Minute Meals
(1 raffle ticket)
Chandana Pandrangi
12. Dark Chocolate Made with Icewine
(3 raffle tickets)
Lee and Friends
13. Cooking at Home with Pedatha
(12 raffle tickets)
M M
14. Dakshin
(2 raffle tickets)
Gururajan
15. Essential Andhra Cookbook
(7 raffle tickets)
Dee and K
16. World Vegetarian
(4 raffle tickets)
Ranjini Rajeevan
17. Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cooking
(1 raffle ticket)
Spandana and Jagadish
18. The Red Chilli
(1 raffle ticket)
Sreelu of Tasty Travels

All the winners will be notified via Email. The winners have to provide and confirm their shipping addresses. The prize sponsors will then send the gifts directly to the winners. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for the prizes to reach you. Thank you.

Update on April 13th, 2008

This is an update on FAHC fundraising conducted last October.

The money raised through the fund-drive on Mahanandi went directly to the parent organization, VK Narayanan’s (VKN) - “Feed A Hungry Child organization (FAHC)”.

During November 07, VKN emailed us enquiring about opening a new FAHC chapter, I replied with details about our Nandyala school and the work we are doing. My husband, Vijay who manages the school also showed interest. VKN and Vijay started talking. We also consulted our father-in-law who is a trustee of the Nandyala school. This is what happened next.

My father-in-law, Sri Venkata Subbaiah traveled to Kerala on November 16th, 07 to meet and see the good work FAHC doing. From Nandyala, he went to Palakkad and from there to Pattenchery village, FAHC location and VKN’s ancestral home.


My FIL, Sri Venkata Subbaiah with VKN’s guruji, Sri Vijayasekharan
at Pattenchery home, Kerala.


Greeting with gifts for FAHC-children, Pattenchery.


Sharing a meal with FAHC team, Pattenchery.


My Father-in-Law with FAHC Trustees and Team at Pattenchery.

Impressed with the FAHC work at Pattenchery, my father-in-law gave us a green signal. More talks about what, when, and how. Things started to come together. During December 2007, ten needy children were selected from our school. Met with their parents and consent was taken. On January 26th 2008, on the Republic Day weekend, VKN, his wife, three children and FAHC team from Kerala visited Nandyala. Here is what happened next:


VKN and FAHC Team with my father-in-law at Nandyala School.
(There are 10 children, but only 9 were present for the photo)


FAHC Kerala team, meeting with children and family members at Nandyala, Andhra.


Eggs, Chana dal, Moong dal, Toor dal, Rice, Wheat Flour and Cooking oil ~ Food to be given to FAHC children’s family members, along with milk, fruits and vegetables.


FAHC ~ Nandyala: A Foodblogs~Family Project
Sharing food and smiles with children and family members.

FAHC Nandyala unit is providing essential groceries and food grains every month, starting from January 2008 to a total of ten children. The children are also getting good education at our school via the scholarship program we sponsor. The plan is to support the children until they finish their high school education.

This was possible only because of community effort by the wonderful food bloggers and the food blog readers. We thank you all for your generous contributions and support shown. I also thank my family members for their unconditional and wholehearted support and efforts. We hope to do this on a larger scale next year.

Note:

The money raised through the fund-drive on Mahanandi went directly to the parent organization, FAHC. All the transactions and expenditures are properly accounted, monitored and audited by the trust board established by FAHC. Before starting the dedicated unit at Nandyala, the trust members had personally visited and met with the children and their families to identify the genuinely needy children. All the expenses, payments and distribution process are properly documented and transparently maintained. For further details, please contact VK Narayanan at FAHC.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Monday October 15, 2007 at 12:09 am- permalink)
Comments (37)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Naaga Keshar, Cloves and Marathi Moggu

NaagaKeshar, Cloves and Marathi Moggu
Clockwise from left: Naaga Keshar, Cloves and Marathi Moggu
Special Spices from India ~ for This Week’s Indian Kitchen

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Ingredients, Indian Kitchen, Herbs and Spices (Sunday October 14, 2007 at 1:52 pm- permalink)
Comments (29)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

It’s Chakalaka, Baby!

Chakalaka ~ South African Vegetarian Dish
Chakalaka

African food, at least here in the west, is usually restricted to East African staples like the delicious Ethiopian dosa, the Injera or entrees such as the equally delectable Moroccan chickpea stew (normally served over couscous) common to North Africa.

But what of the quintessentially South African Chakalaka?

As one examines the recipe, it’s not hard to imagine South African cooks venturing out into their vegetable garden one hot day, picking onions, red peppers, tomatoes and any other readily available seasonal produce. As the vegetables cooked, they probably craved some of the flavors they remember smelling as they walked down a street with Indian houses. Inspired, they might have thrown in a liberal dose of curry powder into the simmering vegetables in the pot. Since many variations also include tinned baked beans, hungry laborers might have adapted it as a quick and satisfying one-pot meal at the end of a hard day of slogging it in the gold mines.

With my well-equipped Indian kitchen, Chakalaka was a breeze to whip up. Indeed, the Indian influences are not surprising. Indians have been in South Africa longer than Caucasians have been in Canada! So at least for 7-8 generations. In fact, our beloved Mahatma Gandhi cut his revolutionary teeth in South Africa.

But back to Chakalaka (don’t you just love the sound of the name?)

While the jury is still out on whether Chakalaka is a chunky ketchup or a sauce or a cooked salsa (could be either); on whether it should be served as a side dish or a condiment (served as both) and if it should be eaten hot or cold (served either way), this spicy and always vegetarian concoction has now come to be identified as the definitive taste of South Africa. There’s even a restaurant in London named for this dish. Featuring a standard base of onions, tomatoes and peppers; this versatile dish is open to endless experimentation.

Other bloggers tell us that traditionally, Chakalaka is often served as a sauce with a maize porridge (Mielie Pap) that is eaten predominantly by the local black population. It’s also served with bread or the ragi-like Samp, made of maize. It can also be spotted as an accompaniment at South African barbecues called Braais (pronounced “bry”, rhyming with the word “cry”)

In the spirit of making a mean Chakalaka that is true to its African roots as well as its spirit of assimilation and innovation, my version is based on a number of recipes found online as well as one that was featured in the Toronto star.


Red, Orange and Yellow ~ Peppers in Autumn Colors

Recipe:
(Makes enough for approx 30 tablespoon servings)

2 tablespoons of sunflower oil
1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and finely diced
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely diced
4 fresh green chillies, slit
1 big red onion, finely chopped
A pound (4 to 6) juicy tomatoes, finely chopped
3 bell peppers, chopped into 1cm X 1cm pieces
2 carrots and 2 potatoes chopped into 1cm X 1cm pieces
Curry powder - 1 heaped tablespoon.
Red beans - one cup, pre-soaked and pressure-cooked to tender
Salt - one teaspoon, or to taste
Fresh coriander for garnish

In a saucepan, heat up the oil and saute ginger, garlic, chillies and onions to soft. Add the salt and curry powder. Add the tomatoes and cook till mushy and of sauce consistency. Add peppers, carrots and potatoes. Cook till they are of a desired softness. Add the red beans and cook for 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and add coriander. Check seasoning levels and serve with rice or breads of your choice.

A small confession. After adding the beans, I tasted it and found the heat was a bit too much. So I caved and added a teaspoon of jaggery at the end. Unsuspecting victims, tasters of the dish said it took them to whole new levels of delayed heat which overwhelmed the palate after the initial deceptive sweetness. But they all agreed they couldn’t get enough of it!

Chakalaka with Chapatis and Pomegranate
Chakalaka with Chapatis and Pomegranate ~ Meal Today

~ Article Contributed by Janani Srinivasan
Photos by Indira Singari.

Kitchen Notes:
Other vegetables can also be added to Chakalaka - cauliflower, zucchini, string beans etc
For curry powder - if you have access to it, I recommend the fiery Sri Lankan Niru brand powder so ubiquitous in Toronto. If not, any other store-bought or homemade will do. The South African recipes recommend a local brand called “leaf masala”.
To be true to the grassroots appeal of this dish, you could use a can of baked beans from the local supermarket. Vegetarians check labels to ensure it’s free of lard or any other animal ingredients. If you can soak your own from scratch, that’s even better.
More on Chakalaka : Chakalaka 101, and Culinary Musings from Cape Town

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Bell Pepper, Red Beans (Chori), Peppers, Janani Srinivasan (Thursday October 11, 2007 at 6:30 pm- permalink)
Comments (26)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Mooga-Gaathi with Moong Bean Sprouts

Sprouted Moong Dal and Fresh, Tender Coconut
Fresh, Tender Coconut and Moong Beans, Sprouted at Home

Mooga-Gaathi, a traditional Goan-Konkani recipe with sprouted moong beans and fresh coconut may sound like another unassuming moong dal preparation. But you would be delighted to find out the appetite-arousing attitude of this homey, gentle sounding dish. All thanks to spices - nutmeg, cloves, coriander and peppercorn.

The recipe is from my friend Veena Parrikar’s kitchen. I made small changes here and there to the original to suit my taste. Easy to prepare, minimum work, no cutting or slicing things, and satisfying results. A perfect autumn recipe and a must try for sprouted moong bean fans. I totally recommend.


a Round of Ground Coconut and Spices - Black Peppercorn, Cloves, Nutmeg and Coriander Seeds

Recipe:
(for two, for two meals)

Sprouted moong(mung) beans - 4 cups
Fresh coconut gratings - 2 tablespoons
Spices:
Nutmeg - a small piece
Cloves - 3
Coriander seeds - 1 teaspoon
Black Peppercorn - ¼ teaspoon
Dried red chillies - 2
Tamarind pulp - 2 teaspoons
Turmeric - ¼ teaspoon
Salt - ½ teaspoon or to taste
For popu or tadka:
1 tablespoon ghee or oil
8 curry leaves
¼ teaspoon each - cumin, mustard seeds and asafoetida

1. Place a wide pot on stove-top and heat.
Add and dry-roast the nutmeg, cloves, coriander seeds, black pepper and dried red chillies to fragrance. Remove them to a mixer. Add fresh coconut and grind to smooth paste. For easy blending, you could also add about half cup water.

2. In the same pot, take sprouted moong beans. Add about 2 to 3 cups of water and stir in salt. Cover and cook. When moong beans reach required level of tenderness, add the ground-spice paste, tamarind and turmeric. (I also added a tablespoon of jaggery.) Mix well and simmer on medium heat.

3. While the moong is simmering, do the popu or tadka. In a small skillet, heat oil until a curry leaf tossed in it sizzles. Add and toast curry leaves to pale gold. Next goes the cumin, mustard seeds and asafoetida. Wait for the mustard seeds to splutter. And, immediately add the skillet contents to simmering moong dal. Mix, reduce heat and simmer for another five to ten minutes to blend the flavors.

Serve or spoon into a small bowl and enjoy with rice or chapatis.


Mooga-Gaathi with Chapatis and Jujebe Fruits (Gangiregi Pandlu) ~ Meal on a Autumn Day

Notes:
The original recipe did not have cumin seeds in tadka/popu. They are not used in gaathi.
How to sprout Moong Beans: Soak moong beans in water overnight. Next morning, drain into a muslin covered colander. Cover the beans with cloth, and keep the colander in a warm area. Sprinke water occasionally to keep the cloth moist. Within a day, you start seeing the sprouts. Wait for next morning. There you go, you have your own homemade sprouts ready for Mooga-Gaathi.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Moong Dal (whole), Coconut (Fresh), Sprouts (Molakalu) (Monday October 8, 2007 at 9:28 pm- permalink)
Comments (20)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Dagad Phool, Kala Elachi, Badal Phool and Naagkeshar

Dagad Phool,  Black Cardamom, Badal Phool and Nagakeshar to prepare Goda Masala
Clockwise from left: Dagad Phool, Kala Elachi, Badal Phool and Naagkeshar
Spices to Prepare Goda Masala ~ for This Week’s Indian Kitchen


from Hindi/Marathi to Telugu and English:
Dagad Phool = Kallupachi (Black Stone Flower)
Kala Elachi = Nalla Elakulu (Black Cardamom)
Badal Phool = Anaspuvvu (Star Anise)
NaagaKeshar = Naaga Sagaralu

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Ingredients, Indian Kitchen (Sunday October 7, 2007 at 3:50 pm- permalink)
Comments (18)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Weekend Fund-drive: Subscribe to Smiles

Vijay K Narayan of My Dhaba food blog is requesting us all to donate smiles through the Feed a Hungry Child (FAHC) fund-drive. FAHC operates on the principle that all children are entitled to a decent meal. Children who do not get proper meals are unjustly put in this condition. These children did not choose their parents nor are they responsible for their parents’ financial condition. FAHC addresses the ultimate holistic need, the hunger of each child it supports, and believes that illiteracy, malnutrition, and other concerns can only be addressed when hunger is appeased.

With the help of volunteers, FAHC has begun to supply feeding kits to 14 children and their families in Palakkad district of Kerala in India, since April 2007. Now FAHC needs our help. The fundraising goal is $ 3,360. I think we can do it easily. Please click the Chip In button at the top right of the site, and contribute whatever you can. If you require additional incentive to contribute, check out the contents of feeding kit and try to remain unmoved.

Host unlimited photos at slide.com for FREE!

The Children that FAHC Supports via Donate Smiles Fund-drive


Donate Smiles and Move the Mark towards the Goal

For additional information about FAHC and Donate Smiles Fund-drive:
Website: FAHC
Contact: info.fahc@gmail.com

******************

To the Subscribers to Smiles
S and Madhavi
Thank you!

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal) (Sunday October 7, 2007 at 12:54 am- permalink)
Comments (8)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Fenugreek Seeds (Methi, Menthulu)

Fenugreek Seeds (Menthulu, Methi)

The one flavor category that is fading away from our meals today is the “bitter” flavor. The bitter taste category is considered to be one of the most healing and cleansing tastes by Ayurveda. Use of fenugreek seeds in traditional tadka is a good way to incorporate the bitter taste once in a while.

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is a member of the pea family. Fenugreek plant is an annual with yellowish-white flowers and its pods contain 10-20 seeds. The common method of harvesting is to uproot the whole plant, allow them to dry in the Sun and then remove the seeds by threshing.

Whole fenugreek seeds have no aroma but once ground, they release flavor and sharp, spicy aroma. These seeds are very high in protein. 3.5 ounces (100 gms) of uncooked seeds supply 23 gms of protein. This is almost equivalent to the amount of protein found in a 3 -3.5 ounces serving of meat, fish or poultry.

Fresh Fenugreek, Menthi Kura, Methi
Fresh Fenugreek Leaves (Menthi Kura, Methi)

Methi (Fenugreek) Sprouts
Fenugreek Sprouts (Methi, Menthula Molakalu)

Fenugreek seed sprouts are used in salads. These sprouts are rich in iron and phosphorous. Juice from the sprouts is considered a cleanser of the kidneys and bladder.

In Maharashtra, we make an interesting pickle with methi sprouts, called Methi-Mirchi. This pickle stays good just for one to two days .

¼ cup fenugreek sprouts
1 Green Chilli – slit in middle and then cut into small pieces
2 tsp Mustard seeds
Pinch each - Asafoetida and turmeric
1 Lemon and salt to taste

Heat oil. Add mustards seeds, asafoetida, and turmeric. When mustard seeds start to pop, then add fenugreek sprouts and green Chilli. Mix well. Take off the heat. Add salt to taste and squeeze lemon juice. This pickle has a great combination of bitter, spicy and sour tastes.

Methi-Mirchi Pickle ~ From Anjali's Kitchen
Methi-Mirchi Pickle ~ From Anjali’s Kitchen

Fenugreek seeds are antiseptic and warming. It also has expectorant qualities and is used to ease coughs and sore throat. Fenugreek tea is used as a Blood builder and cleanser.

To make fenugreek tea – bruise 2 tablespoons of seeds. Add four cups of water and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for ten minutes. Add honey or lemon to flavor.

One of the five spices in Panch phoran is fenugreek seed. They are also added in curry powder, sambar powder and essential picking spice. It’s a very common practice for most of us to add a few fenugreek seeds to tadka when making everyday dal.

Dal-Methi with fenugreek seeds is a common dal among us Maharashtrians. I make this dal at least 2-3 times a month and it’s a good way to introduce fenugreek seeds to kids.

To one cup toor dal, add two to three teaspoons of fenugreek seeds and two cups of water. Pressure-cook to soft. Heat oil. Add mustard seeds, turmeric, green chilli and asafoetida. Add the toor dal-methi mix. Cook for two minutes. Season with salt and cilantro. Serve with roti.

Ingredients for Dal-Methi ~ from Anjali's Kitchen
Ingredients for Dal-Methi ~ from Anjali’s Kitchen

Ah! And how can we talk about fenugreek seeds and not talk about Fenugreek Seed Laddu (Methi Laddu)? Considered to be good for health and winter warmers, methi laddus are consumed in winter season to ward off cold, cough and fever. Here is a simple methi laddu recipe from Bawarchi.

It’s also a common practice in many parts of India to give methi laddu to the lactating mothers. I had these laddus after my daughters birth and many who have tasted these laddus would agree with me that they do not bring out the “hmm…” feeling. But Lakshmi Ammal of “Cook Food and Serve Love” has come up with an interesting Sweet Fenugreek Pongal. I wish I knew about this pongal eight years back.:) (Since fenugreek seeds are considered a uterine stimulant, they are avoided during pregnancy.)

Packed with protein and punch, and with so many benefits, it’s no wonder that the tiny fenugreek seeds have earned a very respectable place in our Indian spice box.

~ Guest Article by Anjali Damerla of Supreme Spice

******************

If you have questions about fenugreek seeds, please post them in comments section. Anjali would be glad to answer them for you. Thanks.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Indian Ingredients, Menthi Kura(Fenugreek), Anjali Damerla, Methi, Kasuri Methi (Thursday October 4, 2007 at 6:16 pm- permalink)
Comments (44)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

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