Mahanandi

Living in Consciousness ~ Indi(r)a’s Food and Garden Weblog

Chipotle Chilli Chutney

My enthusiasm for food blogging events has been going south in recent months. I am not able to muster up much energy like before. Even my beloved event JFI, featuring an ingredient that I worship (chillies) couldn’t pepper me enough. The motivation is there, but I don’t know what’s going on with me, it’s not manifesting into actual results. Well, I guess this is another food blogging phase that I have to go through.

After observing my mental struggle, my kind husband Vijay offered some help. “Tell me what to do, I will make it and will take the pictures. But in writing and publishing the results, you are on your own buddy”, he said. How can I resist such affectionate offer? So here it is, the chipotle chilli chutney for JFI: Chillies. My recipe through Vijay’s magic hands.

Chipotle Chillies, Cherry Tomatoes and Garlic
Chipotle Chillies, Cherry Tomatoes and Garlic ~ Ingredients for Chipotle Chilli Chutney

Recipe:

Chipotle chillies - 6
Cherry tomatoes - 1 pound
Garlic cloves - 6
Sea salt and cane sugar - Half teaspoon each
Peanut oil - 1 tablespoon

Soak the Chipotles:
Take chipotle chillies in a cup. Pour and cover with hot water, about half cup. Soak until pliable about 30 minutes.

Grill the Tomatoes and Garlic:
In a wide cast-iron skillet, heat the peanut oil to smoking point. Add and brown the garlic first, then add the cherry tomatoes. Cook until the tomatoes are lightly browned. Turn off the heat and cool completely.

Blend:
Transfer the chipotles and the water they soaked in to a Sumeet style mixer. Pulse for few minutes. Add the roasted garlic, tomatoes, salt and sugar. Blend to smooth. Remove to a clean, glass jar.

Chipotles bring not only spiciness but also a unique smoky flavor and the chutney tastes terrific with chapatis, French fries etc.


Chapatis with Tomato Dal and Chipotle Chilli Chutney ~ Our Meal Today and
My Contribution to JFI:Chilli, Hosted by Lovely Nandita of Saffron Trail

Kitchen notes:
Chipotle chillies are mature jalapenos that have been dried and smoked, can be purchased at Mexican grocery shops. Unlike the Indian variety dried red chillies, Mexican originated chipotles have a hard bark like skin. Prior soaking in water is needed for easy, smooth blending.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Tomato, Peppers, Dried Red Chillies, Jihva For Ingredients (Wednesday August 1, 2007 at 2:44 pm- permalink)
Comments (17)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Green Brinjals with Cumin

Vankaya with Jeelakarra Karam:

“Let’s consider a situation when you are all alone at home. You are hungry and would like to satisfy your cravings. What will you cook if you want to cook for yourself?”

Asks talented foodblogger Live2Cook.

Just like her, if brinjals are in my vegetable stash, instead of indulging in junk food, I would be motivated enough to prepare a decent meal. I enjoy brinjals that much. Particularly green brinjals which we call Poluru Vankayalu in Telugu. I am one of those people with a passion for green brinjals.

Meal is for myself, so I would go for simple ten-minute preparations like brinjal with ginger or today’s recipe, “Brinjal with Cumin”. This little-known but worth-knowing cumin flavored brinjal curry is a delight to the senses and a must try for green brinjal fans.


Green Brinjals (Poluru Vankayalu)

Recipe:

Aromatic Cumin Powder (Jeelakarra Karam):
Take 1 tablespoon cumin, 1 roughly chopped plump garlic clove, 4 red chillies and a pinch of salt in a grinder. Grind to smooth without adding water.

Green Brinjals (Poluru Vankaya):
Pick 15 young and firm green brinjals. Remove the stem end and wash. Finely slice brinjals lengthwise like shown in the picture above.

Cooking the Curry (Kura):
Heat a wide skillet. Add a teaspoon of peanut oil. When the oil is hot, add a pinch each - cumin, mustard seeds and five each - curry leaves and roughly chopped garlic pieces. When they start to turn to gold, add the brinjal pieces.

Saute on medium-high heat, mixing in-between. Green brinjals cook fast, so be ready with aromatic cumin powder. Sprinkle the cumin powder and also turmeric and salt to taste. Toss to mix well and cook few more minutes, until the brinjal pieces are just tender but still green. Serve hot.

Cumin flavored green brinjal curry tastes great with rice/chapati, toasted bread/bagel or with papad.


Cumin Flavored Green Brinjal Curry on a Papad ~ Meal for Myself
For JFI~Eggplant Event Hosted by Lovely Sangeeta of Ghar Ka Khana

Recipe source: Amma, Nandyala

*******************

How many of you know that green brinjals are cultivated in India and they are named after a village called “Poluru” near Nandyala region, Andhra Pradesh?

More Green Brinjal (Poluru Vankaya) Recipes:
Stuffed Brinjal Curry (Gutti Vankaya Kura)
Brinjal-Potato Curry
Green Brinjal-Fresh Amaranth Curry

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Amma & Authentic Andhra, Vankaya (Brinjal), Jihva For Ingredients, Cumin (Jeelakarra) (Sunday July 1, 2007 at 1:00 pm- permalink)
Comments (24)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Jackfruit~Banana Cake

Finely Chopped Jackfruit Pieces
Jackfruit ~ Finely Chopped

Jackfruit and bananas may seem an unlikely combination, but the soothing sweetness of banana is the perfect antidote to the tingly-ness effect of jackfruit. Also, baking a coffee cake is a good way to use the surfeit of super-yield fresh jackfruit or leftover canned fruit. This is an easy as well as delicious dessert that tastes much naughtier than it really looks.

Recipe:

1. In a bowl, take 2 cups of all-purpose flour, add a cup each - finely chopped jackfruit, cashews and golden raisins. Stir in a teaspoon of baking soda, baking powder and cardamom powder. Also half cup of sugar. Mix.

2. Mash two ripe bananas to smooth paste and add to the flour mixture.

3. Add about quarter cup of melted ghee (or oil) and one to two cups of warm milk or water to the flour mixture.

4. Stir the ingredients to combine them thoroughly. Pour the batter into a greased cake pan. Level evenly.

5. Bake the cake in a preheated 350 F oven for about 30 to 40 minutes or until a knife inserted in the cake comes out clean. Cool to room temperature. Cut and serve.

This cake is like something you see at an organic aisle of bread/cake section in a grocery shop. Dense, full of fruit and nut, moist but not at all crumbly.

Cake Batter Ready for Baking
Cake Batter Ready for Baking


Hot Cake Fresh Out of Oven

Cake Reversed onto a Plate and a Piece sliced
A Piece of Jackfruit~Banana Cake for JFI:Jackfruit at Jugalbandi


Recipe Source: My Own Creation
You can find jackfruit - fresh, frozen and canned at Asian grocery shops.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in All-Purpose Flour(Maida), Cashews, Bananas, Sugar, Jihva For Ingredients, Jackfruit (Panasa) (Thursday May 31, 2007 at 9:37 pm- permalink)
Comments (23)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Honeyed Jackfruit with Raspberry Granita

Finely chopped ripe jackfruit tossed with honey and served with a scoop of raspberry granita. Another simple jackfruit dessert that tastes refreshing especially after a spicy meal. A cool treat for JFI-Jackfruit.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Fruits, Jihva For Ingredients, Jackfruit (Panasa) (Wednesday May 30, 2007 at 9:38 pm- permalink)
Comments (17)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Pala Kova Filled Jackfruits

Pala Kova Panasa Thonalu :

Ripe Jackfruit
Jackfruit

Jackfruit is known to make people leap.

Jumping jacks or darne se gayab, the fruit dinosaur incites strong reaction in many. For us, it’s always been a lovable giant. The crusty exterior masks the sweet tasting, nutritional delights inside and ripe fruit perfume alone makes up the lack of outside glamour. This enchanting giant of fruit kingdom is finally getting its Jihvā fame, thanks to laudable choice by the Bee and Jai of Jugalbandi. Jackfruit is the June Jihvā Ingredient.

My contribution to Jihvā Jackfruit is this. Ripe jackfruit filled with homemade Pala Kova. Even if you don’t like Pala Kova, the jackfruit will be there to satisfy the sweet tooth.:), or vice-versa.

Jackfruit Filled with Pala Kova
Jackfruit Filled with Pala Kova (Pala Kova Panasa Thonalu)~ for JFI Jackfruit

Recipe:
Prepare Pala Kova following the recipe directions listed here.
Fill the jackfruits with Pala Kova.
Enjoy!

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Jihva For Ingredients, Jackfruit (Panasa) (Tuesday May 29, 2007 at 9:17 pm- permalink)
Comments (15)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

JFI-WBB Event: Green Leafy Vegetables

Green leafy vegetables demand respect! Delicate leaves of ethereal beauty, they are a test of the cook’s patience and prudence. From plucking the leaves to preparing and presenting them in an appetizing manner, they present quite a challenge. As with many matters in life, deal with a light hand and greens will reward you by being tasty and nutritious. Use a heavy hand, they will wilt and weep into nothingness. The spirit or saaram of the greens disappears just like in any abused case. No wonder then, even the experienced cooks use caution and a gentle touch, when it comes to handling greens.

By combining different types of greens, and by accentuating each preparation with the appropriate seasonings and garnishes, it is easy to create a different dish with green leafy vegetables everyday of the year. Fresh leaves, tender stalks, sprouts, sprigs and herbs, each with its own varied texture and complex flavors present an opportunity for the sensitive cook to ceaselessly creative, and also to reflect on the nourishing nature of mother earth.

That is what we, the food bloggers did for “Going Green -JFI:WBB Event”.

Raw, baked, boiled, deep fried, stir-fried, steamed, sauteed, sauced and saucy - some well-treated and some veg-vandalized:), all done of course with well-intentioned love and affection. Here they are - green leafy vegetables in their glorious avatars presented in all colors of rainbow.

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Palak, Palakura, Palang, Keerai (Spinach)

Spinach-Cheese Rolls ~ from Sunita of Sunita's World
Spinach-Cheese Rolls ~ from Sunita of Sunita’s World

Money Bags Florentines with Spinach ~ from Suganya of Tasty Palettes
Money Bags Florentines with Spinach ~ from Suganya of Tasty Palettes

Palak Pakodis with Sweet and Hot Green Chutney ~ from Sharmi of Neivedyam
Palak Pakodis with Sweet and Hot Green Chutney ~ from Sharmi of Neivedyam

Nachani Kobi Palak Kabab (Ragi-Spinach Kababs)<br />
~ from Anjali of Anna Prabrahma
Nachani Kobi Palak Kabab (Ragi-Spinach Kababs) ~ from Anjali of Anna Prabrahma

Palang Saag er Chop (Spinach Cutlets) ~ from Sandeepa of Bong Mom's Cookbook
Palang Saag er Chop (Spinach Cutlets)
~ from Sandeepa of Bong Mom’s Cookbook

Spinach-Egg Cookies ~ from Tigerfish of Teczcape
Spinach-Egg Cookies ~ from Tigerfish of Teczcape

Spinach and Chicken Lasagne ~ from Meeta of What's for Lunch, Honey?
Spinach and Chicken Lasagne ~ from Meeta of What’s for Lunch, Honey?

Spinach Upma ~ from Chandrika of AkshayaPatra
Spinach Upma ~ from Chandrika of AkshayaPatra


Spinach Utappam ~ from Coffee of The Spice Cafe

Spinach, Palak, Pala Kura
Keerai Molagootal - A Spinach Stew, Blended in Coconut , Lentils and spices
~ from Soumya of Food for the Soul

Spinach and Unripe Green Mango
Spinach Mango Dal (Palakura Pullakura) ~ from Me

Sauteed Spinach with Dal ~ from Priya of Priya's Kitchen
Sauteed Spinach with Dal ~ from Priya of Priya’s Kitchen

Keera (Spinach) Sambar ~ Meera of Meera's Blog
Keera (Spinach) Sambar ~ Meera of Meera’s Blog


Spinach Moong Dal Stir-Fry (Pesara Pappu Palakoora) ~ from Mythili of Vindhu

Spinach Keerai ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Spinach Keerai ~ from Mathy of Virundhu

Cheera Urulakkizhangu Masala (Spinach and Potato) ~ from Seena of Simple and Delicious
Cheera Urulakkizhangu Masala ~ from Seena of Simple and Delicious

Keerai Masiyal (Spinach Masala) ~ from Pearlin of Purl up and Crochet
Keerai Masiyal (Spinach Masala) ~ from Pearlin of Purl up and Crochet

Keerai (Spinach) Poritha Kozhambu ~ from Sapna of Indian Monsoon
Keerai (Spinach) Poritha Kozhambu ~ from Sapna of Indian Monsoon

Keerai Side Dish ~ from Pooja of Creative Pooja
Keerai Side Dish ~ from Pooja of Creative Pooja

Palak Molaguthal for Green Lunch ~ from Deepa of Recipes N More
Palak Molaguthal for Green Lunch ~ from Deepa of Recipes N More

Lasooni Palak (Spinach Garlic Sabji) ~ from Sreelu of Sreelu's Tasty Travels
Lasooni Palak (Spinach Garlic Sabji) ~ from Sreelu of Sreelu’s Tasty Travels

Aloo Palak ~ from Anita of A Mad Tea Party
Aloo Palak ~ from Anita of A Mad Tea Party

Spinach Casserole ~ from Sukanya Ramkumar of Hot N' Sweet Bowl
Spinach Casserole ~ from Sukanya Ramkumar of Hot N’ Sweet Bowl

Spinach (Bhendi Palak) ~ from Seema of Recipe Juction
Okra Spinach (Bhendi Palak) ~ from Seema of Recipe Juction

Spinach Kadhi (Taakatli Bhaaji) ~  from Tee of Bhaatukli
Spinach Kadhi (Taakatli Bhaaji) ~ from Tee of Bhaatukli

Palak Kofta ~ from Praveena of Simply Spicy
Palak Kofta ~ from Praveena of Simply Spicy
/

Soya Palak ~ from Revathi of En Ulagam
Soya Palak ~ from Revathi of En Ulagam

Palak Kadi ~ from Musical of Musical's Kitchen
Palak Kadi ~ from Musical of Musical’s Kitchen

Palak Matar Gajar Subzi ~ from Musical of Musical's Kitchen
Palak Matar Gajar Subzi ~ from Musical of Musical’s Kitchen

Palak Paneer ~ from Prema Sundar of My Cookbook
Palak Paneer ~ from Prema Sundar of My Cookbook

Palak Paneer ~ from Bharathy of Spicy Chilly
Palak Paneer ~ from Bharathy of Spicy Chilly

Palak Paneer ~ from Swapna of Swad
Palak Paneer ~ from Swapna of Swad

Spinach Pulav ~ from Shree of Annapoorna
Spinach Pulav ~ from Shree of Annapoorna

Palak Pulav ~ from Nav of Memories and Meals
Palak Pulav ~ from Nav of Memories and Meals

Spinach Raita ~ from Roopa of My Chow Chow Bhath
Spinach Raita ~ from Roopa of My Chow Chow Bhath

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Methi, Menthikura (Fresh Fenugreek Leaves)

Methi Malai Buns ~ from Bee & Jai of Jugalbandi
Methi Malai Buns ~ from Bee & Jai of Jugalbandi

Methi Pakkoda ~ from MT of Menu Today
Methi Pakkoda ~ from MT of Menu Today

Methi Aloo Sevai ~ from Suma of Veggie Platter
Methi Aloo Sevai ~ from Suma of Veggie Platter

Methi Upma ~ from Pavani of Cook's Hideout
Methi Upma ~ from Pavani of Cook’s Hideout

Methi Thelpaa ~ from Anupama of Food n More
Methi Thelpaa ~ from Anupama of Food n More

Methi Paratha with Kasuri Methi ~ from Manasi of A Cook @ Heart
Kasuri Methi Paratha and Daal Palak ~ from Manasi of A Cook @ Heart

Methi Paratha
Methi-Green Garbanzo Paratha from Sapna of Indian Monsoon

Methi Dal (Fenugreek Dal) ~ from Priya of Aahaar Vihaar
Methi Dal (Fenugreek Dal) ~ from Priya of Aahaar Vihaar

Methi Dal (Methikura Pappu) ~ from Latha of Masala Magic
Methi Dal (Methikura Pappu) ~ from Latha of Masala Magic

Methi-Dal Sabzi ~ from Ramya of Mane Adige
Methi-Dal Sabzi ~ from Ramya of Mane Adige

Methi Kela nu Shaak (Methi and Banana Curry) ~ from Richa of As Dear As Salt
Methi Kela nu Shaak (Methi and Banana Curry) ~ from Richa of As Dear As Salt

Methi n Meen (Fenugreek and Fish) ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Methi n Meen (Fenugreek and Fish) ~ from Mathy of Virundhu

Methi Biryani ~ from Rajani of Amma Cheppindi
Methi Biryani ~ from Rajani of Amma Cheppindi

Methi Rice (Menthikura Annam) ~ from Latha of Masala Magic<br />
Methi Rice (Menthikura Annam) ~ from Latha of Masala Magic

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Agathi Keerai (Hummingbird Tree Leaves)

Agaththik keerai Sodhi ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Agaththik keerai Sodhi ~ from Mathy Kandasamy of Virundhu

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Amaranth Leaves (Thotakura, Koyagura)

Thotakura Vepudu (Amaranth Stir-Fry) ~ from Sailaja of Sailu's Food
Thotakura Vepudu (Amaranth Stir-Fry) ~ from Sailaja of Sailu’s Food


Fresh Amaranth Leaves and Green Brinjals Curry
Thota kura and Poluru Vankaya Kura ~ from Me


Amaranth Dal (Thotakura Pappu) ~ from Me

Thotakura Avakaya (Amaranth-Mango Pickle) ~ from Anusharaji of Talimpu
Thotakura Avakaya (Amaranth-Mango Pickle) ~ from Anusharaji of Talimpu

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Arugula

Arugula Soup ~ from Sig of Live to Eat
Arugula Soup ~ from Sig of Live to Eat

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Arvi/Arbi/Colocasia/Taro Leaves

Patra Bajia (Stuffed Arbi/Colocasia Leaves) ~ from Pelicano of Elachi et Cetera...
Patra Bajia (Stuffed Arbi/Colocasia Leaves)
~ from Pelicano of Elachi et Cetera…

Steamed Paatra(Taro) Leaves ~ from MT of Menu Today
Steamed Paatra(Taro) Leaves ~ from MT of Menu Today

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Bachali Leaves

Dal with Bachali Aaku/Purslane Leaves/Mayalu Bhaji/Mong Toi<br />
~ from Dee of Ammalu's Kitchen
Dal with Bachali Aaku/Purslane Leaves/Mayalu Bhaji/Mong Toi
~ from Dee of Ammalu’s Kitchen

Bachali -Chana Dal in Tamarind Sauce ~ from Madhavi of My Veggie World
Bachali -Chana Dal in Tamarind Sauce ~ from Madhavi of My Veggie World

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Beetroot Greens

Dal Saag with Beet Greens and Spinach ~ from Asha of Foodie's Hope
Dal Saag with Beet Greens and Spinach ~ from Asha of Foodie’s Hope

Tambdi Bhajji with Beet Greens ~ from Vee of Past, Present and Me
Tambdi Bhajji with Beet Greens ~ from Vee of Past, Present and Me

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Bok Choy

Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Cashews ~ from Smitha of Spiced for Life
Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Cashews ~ from Smitha of Spiced for Life

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Broccoli Rabe and Brussels Sprouts

Broccoli Rabe (Rapini) Parathas  and Saag Gobi ~ Rinku of Cooking in Westchester
Broccoli Rabe (Rapini) Parathas ~ Rinku of Cooking in Westchester

Brussels Sprouts with Coconut and Ginger ~ from Vani of Batasari
Brussels Sprouts with Coconut and Ginger ~ from Vani of Batasari

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Cabbage Sprouts, Cabbage Leaves, Cabbage

Cabbage Sprouts Thoran ~ from Annita of My Pleasure and My Treasure
Cabbage Sprouts Thoran ~ from Annita of My Pleasure and My Treasure

Kova Ilai Varai (Cabbage Leaves Stir-fry) ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Kova Ilai Varai (Cabbage Leaves Stir-fry) ~ from Mathy of Virundhu

Cabbage Pathrode ~ from Smita of Smita Serves You Right
Cabbage Pathrode ~ from Smita of Smita Serves You Right

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Celery

Celery Thokku ~ from Hema of Vegetarian Concoctions
Celery Thokku ~ from Hema of Vegetarian Concoctions

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Chard ~ Rainbow and Swiss

Rainbow Chard - Mushroom Sandwich ~ from Nupur of One Hot Stove
Rainbow Chard - Mushroom Sandwich ~ from Nupur of One Hot Stove

Red Chard Aloo Subzi ~ from Musical of Musical's Kitchen
Red Chard Aloo Subzi ~ from Musical of Musical’s Kitchen

Red Chard Aloo Stuffed Parathas ~ from Musical of Musical's Kitchen
Red Chard Aloo Stuffed Parathas ~ from Musical of Musical’s Kitchen

Swiss Chard and Spinach Blend with Paneer ~ from Trupti of The Spice Who Loved Me
Swiss Chard and Spinach Blend with Paneer
~ from Trupti of The Spice Who Loved Me

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Collard Greens

Collard Greens
Collard Greens “Sushi” Bites ~ from Sheela of Delectable Victuals

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Coriander/Cilantro/Dhania/Kottimera:

Spicy Spirals with Green Cilantro Chutney ~ from Manisha of Indian Food Rocks
Spicy Spirals with Green Cilantro Chutney ~ from Manisha of Indian Food Rocks

Patudi/Sambar Vadi ~ from Bhags of Crazy Curry
Patudi/Sambar Vadi ~ from Bhags of Crazy Curry

Kothamalli (Coriander) Chutney Sandwiches ~ from Nags of For the Cook in Me
Kothamalli (Coriander) Chutney Sandwiches ~ from Nags of For the Cook in Me

Spicy Coriander Chutney ~ from Swapna of Tastes from my Kitchen
Spicy Coriander Chutney ~ from Swapna of Tastes from my Kitchen

Cilantro Rice (Kottimera Annam) ~ from Suma of Veggie Platter
Cilantro Rice (Kottimera Annam) ~ from Suma of Veggie Platter

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Curry Leaves/ Karivepaku/ Karipatta

Chammanthipodi (Dried Chutney Powder) ~ from RP of My Workshop
Chammanthipodi (Dried Chutney Powder) ~ from RP of My Workshop

Karivepaku Kaaram Podi ~ from Smitha of Andhra Food Network
Karivepaku Kaaram Podi ~ from Smitha of Andhra Food Network

Curry Leaves Kudhi Menusu ~ from Mythreyee of Try this Recipe
Curry Leaves Kudhi Menusu ~ from Mythreyee of Try this Recipe


Curryleaf powder rice (Kariveppilai podi saadam ) ~ from Revathi of En-Ulagam

Curry Leaves Dal ~ from Linda of Out of the Garden
Curry Leaves Dal ~ from Linda of Out of the Garden

The Elixir of Life: Curry Leaves Infused Ganji ~ from Me
The Elixir of Life: Curry Leaves Infused Ganji (Kanji) ~ from Me

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Dill (Suwa)

Fresh Dill (Suwa)
Fresh Dill - Ridge Gourd Curry (Suwa~Turai Curry) ~ from Me

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Drumstick Leaves (Murungai, Munagakaya Aaku)

Whole Wheat Dosai with Murungai Leaves  ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Whole Wheat Dosai with Murungai Leaves
~ from Mathy Kandasamy of Virundhu

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Kaffir Lime Leaves:

Lime Leaves Powder with Kaffir Lime Leaves ~ from Priya of Live to Cook
Lime Leaves Powder with Kaffir Lime Leaves ~ from Priya of Live to Cook

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Kale Greens

Kale Greens and White Beans in Tomato Gravy ~ from the Cooker of The Cooker
Kale Greens and White Beans in Tomato Gravy ~ from the Cooker of The Cooker

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Mint/Pudina

Pudina Chutney ~ from Manju of Me, Myself and More
Pudina Chutney ~ from Manju of Me, Myself and More

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Mixed Greens (Salad Greens):

Spring Garden Salad from Homegrown Greens ~ from Bee&Jai of Jugalbandi
Spring Garden Salad from Homegrown Greens ~ from Bee&Jai of Jugalbandi

Saundhe Aloo with Pale bhaji (Mixed Greens with Potatoes) ~ from Anjali of Anna Parabrahma
Saundhe Aloo with Pale bhaji (Mixed Greens with Potatoes) ~
from Anjali of Anna Parabrahma

Fresh Herb Salad with Halloumi Cheese ~ from Reena of Spices of Kerala
Fresh Herb Salad with Halloumi Cheese ~ from Reena of Spices of Kerala

Lisa's Chicken Ceaser Salad ~ from Sajeda of Chachi's Kitchen
Lisa’s Chicken Ceaser Salad ~ from Sajeda of Chachi’s Kitchen


Salad Synergy for Spring : Salad Greens and Boiled Peanuts ~ from Me

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Mustard Greens/Sarson/Avaalu

Sarson Ka Saag ~ From Coffee of The Spice Cafe
Sarson Ka Saag ~ From Coffee of The Spice Cafe

Mutton pieces and Chana dal in Mustard Greens Gravy ~ From Ayesha of Experimenting on Tastebuds
Mutton pieces and Chana dal in Mustard Greens Gravy
~ From Ayesha of Experimenting on Tastebuds

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Neem Leaves (Vepa Aakulu)


Homemade Neem-Clove Tooth Powder ~ From Me

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Ponnanganni, Ponnaganti Kura (Water Amaranth, Gudrisag)

Ponnanganni Varai ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Ponnanganni Varai ~ from Mathy of Virundhu

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Radish Greens (Mooli Patte)

Mooli Patte ki bhurji (Radish Greens Curry) ~ from Dumela of Fusion Food
Mooli Patte ki bhurji (Radish Greens Curry) ~ from Dumela of Fusion Food

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Spring Onions

Spring Onion and Carrot Thoran ~ from Kitchen Fairy of Secret of Taste
Spring Onion and Carrot Thoran
~ from Kitchen Fairy of Secret of Taste

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Tandulka Leaves

Tandulkyachi Bhaji (Tandulka curry) ~ from Madhuli of My Food Court
Tandulkyachi Bhaji (Tandulka curry) ~ from Madhuli of My Food Court

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Vallarai (Pennuwort Leaves)

Vallarai Sambal ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Vallarai Sambal ~ from Mathy Kandasamy of Virundhu

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Water Spinach (Kong Xin Cai, Kang Kung)

Water Spinach (Kong Xin Cai) ~ from Pepper of Frugal Cuisine
Water Spinach (Kong Xin Cai) ~ from Pepper of Frugal Cuisine

Kang Kung(Water Spinach) Mallung ~ from Mathy of Virundhu
Kang Kung(Water Spinach) Mallung ~ from Mathy of Virundhu

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I thank Nandita of Saffron Trail for giving me the opportunity to host and combine the WBB Event with JFI on this special anniversary occasion. Thanks to everyone for participating in this event with great interest and enthusiasm. Meet you all again for June Jackfruit Jihva at Bee and Jai’s Jugalbandi.

Found a green gem that you like? Please click on the photo or title to visit and share your joy with the participant food blogger. I am sure they would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks!

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Jihva For Ingredients (Tuesday May 1, 2007 at 3:50 am- permalink)
Comments (27)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Jihva ~ A Tribute

May 1st, 2007 marks the completion of one year of Jihvā for Ingredients (JFI) , the food blogging event that showcases a food ingredient each month. This event was born out of my desire to celebrate natural ingredients and what they can do for our Jihvā.

From a nervous, tentative beginning, JFI evolved into a confident, inspiring event that captured the hearts and minds of many food lovers. Some of them went from being onlookers and supporters to active participants. Visitors to the event roundups started their own food blogs because they wanted to participate in Jihvā. Such is the attraction of Jihvā. Each month a natural, wholesome ingredient was selected and featured, and over a span of 12 months, a total of about 800 entries and recipes flew in from across the world.

Before beginning another Jihvā year on May 1st, I wanted to pay tribute to the gracious hosts of Jihvā and their ingredients. When I contacted them, they generously opened their hearts and shared their thoughts. From ingredient selection, invitation, fellow bloggers’ response to the time and effort expended in the process, here is the Jihvā experience.

Sailaja of Sailu’s Food, the host of JFI: Dals :

“Jihva to me denotes - food, fun and a culinary learning experience. Each round up is like a well laid out feast with gorgeous pictures, that touch upon food and diverse cultures of our country and the lesser known recipes are highlighted, adding that extra zing to each entry. Living in a country with such diverse cultures, we are hardly aware of the different regional cuisines our country offers. Throughout the length and breadth of the country, rice and lentils are our staple. I chose our beloved nutritious dal as an ingredient to showcase to the world the range of dal dishes our regional cuisines have to offer and also to learn more about the lesser known dal recipes. There are gems out there. And I love dal!
It took me about 3-4 days or 22-24 hours to actually put it all together, right from receiving the entries, compile a list, read each post and get it all together. It was worth all the effort because it our cuisine we are showcasing to the world, we want to present it well so that they understand the rich and diverse culinary heritage of our country and the importance we Indians give to our daily food.
Last but not the least, the utter passion of each blogger and how they all look forward to the final round-up further motivated me and not to mention their genuine warmth, overwhelming encouraging and appreciative response. I always look forward to the next ingredient with each host trying their best to enhance the flavor of Jihva manifold with sincerity and there is a high expectation and anticipation each month as Jihva unfolds with a new ingredient.”

Santhi of Me and My Kitchen, the Host of JFI-Flours:

“The variety of flours used in Indian cooking are so very many and such a huge variety of culinary possibilities with it. And I was not at all disappointed with the out come. Some fantastic and innovative recipes were send in. I had in my mind that I will have two round ups one for sweets and one for savory. I created two folders and sorted the entries as soon as I receive them so that I could keep track of all the entries. I will be honest. It is not very easy to do a round up. My admiration for hosts who do it week after week and month after month has increased tremendously after doing it. But Let me tell you that with all the visual delights every single minute has been most enjoyable. It was just so incredible to see so many fellow bloggers being passionate about food. And the enthusiasm you all have shown has been fantastic. And that is what is bringing me back into blogging world. One incident I have to tell you. When I did not receive an entry from Vaishali of Happy Burp, I was disappointed and so demanded an entry from her. And she responded immediately with an entry! That’s the kind of bond that I have shared with some of you out there. It has been a great pleasure to host this event. Thank to everyone involved with JFI in anyway. This success is a result of everyone out here in food blogosphere.”

Vee of Past Present and Me, the Host of JFI - Special Diwali Edition:

“I loved hosting the Diwali Special. It made my Diwali even more exciting than it already was. It was fun going to all blogs and seeing what they were cooking up and their memories and anecdotes and nostalgia about past Diwali’s. It is what a festival is about, isn’t it? Traditions and memories we grow up with. It was also so much like a virtual diwali meet and greet and exchanging new year wishes. I really got attached to that feeling that it generated. Which is why I opted to host it every year. Thanks for the oppurtunity. Until next time, take care.”

Kay of Towards a Better Tomorrow, the Host of JFI:Jaggery:

“When I first read about JFI - The idea of Jihva and celebration of those ingredients and their Indian flavors sounded wonderful. Little did I know it will do so much more to me.
As I mentioned in my blog, December is my favorite month for many reasons and I thought I’ll be ready to blog again, by December, after some post-partum recovery. I wanted to choose something very very Indian and very very authentic. Jaggery and Coconut tied till the final round and the queen of all sweeteners - Jaggery won! I also wanted to make it more special and requested participants to try out something new - either a dish they had eaten/read or even concoct some new dishes. This was just that - a request! A purely optional one. But wow! When I saw the entries pouring in and saw those new dishes, I felt so overwhelmed. People did try some new stuff and Some had ‘created’ new dishes! I felt so overwhelmed. Thank you guys, for paying heed to my whimsical request and creating some lovely stuff.
Kiran, a lovely nonblogger, sent in her post by mail and what did I find? Methi kheer! Something for a new mom, to help with lactation! How sweet of her to do that? And Lakshmi Ammal had written about ’sweet fenugreek pongal’ for nursing moms. I was touched by these gestures. As fate would have it, My mom couldn’t come to Canada to be with me during the childbirth and recovery. I was missing her ever since I got pregnant and even more, after childbirth, this added to the stress and postpartum blues. Let’s say, I was longing for some motherly comfort… And these people whom I had never met, never exchanged emails with, cared and made something for me. Bless their heart! It was a very emotional moment for me. Thanks Kiran and Lakshmiammal. Puja of Creative Pooja had to type out her post, in one hand, on time, because the other hand was beautifully decorated with Mehendi.:) How sweet of her and how punctual of her! And now, I’ve learnt so much more about jaggery and a few other types of jaggeries and I’ve got tons of new dishes to try out - All with my favorite ingredient on earth. Ain’t that sweet? (Pun intended!):)
About hosting and writing the round up, it didn’t really take much time. After posting the roundup, I sent an email thanking every participant and letting them know about the roundup. Boy! I got some sweet responses to that mail. People are wonderful. What did hosting JFI do to me? After hosting the event, I feel like doing many more in the future and yes, participating in many other events. But the most important thing is, It has brought a sense of ‘belonging to a community’ in me. After studying in many schools and many colleges and worked and lived in many places, I never felt I ‘belonged’ anywhere. But after hosting this event, I feel like I belong here - with my blog friends, where I can truly be myself.”

RP of My Workshop, the Host of JFI:Tomatoes:

“I really had a hard time picking one ingredient. I wanted to choose something that is used in all cuisines. I wanted to make it easy for the participants. So I picked tomatoes, something that is essential in every kitchen. It was easier than I thought even though I got a little nervous before publishing the roundup. Special thanks to Shn of Mishmash, Mallugirl of Malabar Spices, and kitchen fairy of Secret of Taste for supporting me when I needed it. Many have congratulated me for the hard work. I got a couple of how-did-you-do-it mails. To be frank, it wasn’t difficult at all. I used batch processing which made things easy. Adding the caption, of course, had to be done individually. I spent like 10-15 minutes everyday and the roundup was ready in a week. I was so thrilled and wanted to finish it in one sitting, but I didn’t want anyone in my home to suffer because I was busy with the roundup. About the generous response from fellow bloggers - Delighted! I have never received so many mails that are not junk.:) Entries started flowing in since mid March, and everyday I got more and more excited. Sometimes I thought I was getting lost in the middle of so many entries, but I picked up in no time. I received more than 100 entries. I am so happy and I thank everybody again for making it possible.”

Baking Fairy, the host of JFI-Strawberries sent her wishes from Costa Rica. She moved to Costa Rica from SF and opened her own bakery there. She wrote “I bought a small bakery and runnning my own place. I have breakfast and lunch items, most “Indian” base recipes because I love them so much. Hope you will come to visit one day. It is really a great place…Very peaceful…”.

Rosie of What’s the Recipe Today Jim?, currently vacationing in Mexico sent her thanks and wishes to all the participants.

My sincere thanks to Baking Fairy, Sailaja, Santhi, Vineela, Love 2 Cook, Vee, Kay, Ashwini, Rosie, Vaishali and RP for laying the foundation of Jihva tradition.

My heartfelt thanks to all the participants and fellow bloggers who embraced this event to make it their own, and opened up their families’ culinary heirlooms and treasures with such selflessness. Preserving food traditions is critical in these days of globalization and I hope that together we contributed to this effort through Jihvā.

Here are the stars of Jihvā: 2006. May they be part of our culinary traditions forever!

Mango Sauce, mango Juice, Ripe Mango Slice, Green Mango Slice, Dried Mango Pulp Cubes, Amchur Powder ~ All Things Mango
Jihvā: Mango


Jihvā: Strawberries

Toor Dal (Kandi Pappu)
Jihvā: Dals

Besan, Gram Flour, Sanaga Pindi, Chana Dal Flour
Jihvā: Flours

Homemade Soya Milk
Jihvā: Milk

Milk, Rice, Ghee, Jaggery, Golden Raisins and Cashews ~ Ingredients for Bellam Paramannam
Jihvā: Ghee

A Plate Full of Indian Sweets for the Holidays
Jihvā: Diwali Treats

Jaggery (Gur in Hindi and Bellam in Telugu) ~ Sugarcane and Palm
Jihvā: Jaggery

Coconut - Young and Mature
Jihvā: Coconut


Jihvā: Ginger


Jihvā: Potato


Jihvā: Tomato

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Zen (Personal), Jihva For Ingredients (Sunday April 29, 2007 at 9:18 am- permalink)
Comments (20)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Going Green with Green Leafy Vegetables

Jihva for Ingredients (JFI) , the online food blogging event will be celebrating one year anniversary on May 1st.

To mark this special occasion, JFI and Nandita’s WBB are coming together to celebrate the mother earth in this month of Earth Day with a special theme ~ “Going Green with Green Leafy Vegetables”.

Our earth is a unique place in the universe because of the greens. We know that greens create the atmosphere which sustains all life forms. To celebrate the precious greens mother earth offers us, JFI-WBB is going green with green leafy vegetables.

To Participate in JFI-WBB: Green Leafy Vegetables:

Prepare and write about the green leafy vegetables (articles/recipes -breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner) on your blog, during April.

Mail me (mailmahanandi@gmail.com) the links to your posts along with beautiful, focused images of the recipes - in 455×280 pixel size by April 30th.
(Because roundup is a timeconsuming thing to do, I may not be able to accept late entries. If you are interested to participate, please be kind and send the entries in time by 30th, Seattle time.)

I will also participate and do the recap-a colorful parade of green leafy vegetables on May 1st.

double_curve.gif

I would like to invite fellow bloggers to host JFI for June 07 - April 08. Jihva for Ingredients (JFI) is for me, as well as for you food bloggers who wanted to host an event once in a while. It is a rotating event, which means instead of only one host all the time, different food bloggers would host the event every month on their blogs. I think these types of rotating events are interesting to participate, mainly because the hosts not only bring their own personality and enthusiasm, it would also provide a chance to visit and find new blogs and bloggers. More importantly JFI is not about the themes, it is about celebrating the natural ingredients that we use for everyday cooking - one at a time.

What is Jihvā ?
Jihvā, the Sanskrit word means taste, desire and deep longing. This powerful word also represents tongue and taste buds.

What is Jihvā for Ingredients?
I believe for Jihvā to happen, it’s all in the ingredients and how they are cooked. Jihvā for Ingredients (JFI) is online monthly food event, celebrating the Ingredients and what they can do for our Jihvā.

When, what and how?
The entries have to be posted on first day of every month. The host will choose a food ingredient. To participate, cook a recipe with that ingredient and post it on your blog on the first of the month. Send these entries to the host, she/he will do the roundup and showcase all your entries within a week of receiving.

What are the guidelines to host?

1. Feature any natural ingredient and there are many.
2. I’d greatly appreciate if you could pick an ingredient related to India or Indian cuisine. (Which style of cuisine that ingredient prepared is, of course it’s up to the participants).
3. Announce the event on your blog by 3rd of previous month. This will give plenty of time for the participants to shop, prepare, write and post their entry.

Interested to host this event?
To host this event, send me an email. I will update the list below as soon as someone interested in that month. Update: The invitation is closed at this time. All slots are filled up for this Jihva year. No Emails please.

Thanks for your interest and participation. Congratulations to Jihva hosts!


For 2007-2008

May
Mahanandi: Greens
JFI:Greens Recap
September
Neivedyam
January
LetZ Cook
June
Jugalbandi: Jackfruit
October
Ahaar
February
Radhi’s Kitchen
July
Ghar Ka Khana
November
Past, Present & Me
March
My Khazana of Recipes
August
Saffron Trail
December
Out of the Garden
April
Virundhu

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Jihva For Ingredients (Monday April 2, 2007 at 10:27 am- permalink)
Comments (26)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Tomato Bath

JFI, an online food blogging event celebrating the natural ingredients is hosted by sweet and talented RP of My Workshop for April. The ingredient she picked for JFI is Tomatoes. What a fine choice it is to celebrate the spring season with beautiful colors and flavors of tomatoes!

The sheer number of tomato based recipes can be overwhelming and sometimes it is reassuring to go back to an old favorite. So I picked a recipe. A Tiffin box favorite from my childhood called tomato bath. Yes, you read it right. The recipe has bath in its name. In this traditional south Indian recipe, toasted semolina is generously bathed and simmered in tomato juice. Not one or two tomatoes, but a lot of tomatoes are used to prepare tomato bath. This is the main difference between regular upma and tomato bath. Because of generous tomato addition, pale wheat colored semolina changes to bright orange color and the tomato dominates the flavor profile. It’s easy to prepare and even easier to enjoy. A must try for tomato fans.


Tomato and Semolina

Recipe:

2 cups semolina or suji
4 ripe tomatoes - finely chopped (about 2 cups)
6 green chillies - finely chopped
1 small red onion - finely chopped
1 inch piece of ginger - grated
¼ cup each - fresh green peas and charoli nuts (or your choice)

Seasoning: (added to bring crunchy bite and fragrance to tomato bath)
1 tablespoon oil or ghee
6 fresh curry leaves and a tablespoon of finely chopped fresh cilantro
½ tsp each - urad dal, chana dal, cumin and mustard seeds

Place an iron skillet on stove top. On medium heat, add and roast semolina/suji to pale gold color, stirring in-between.

Meanwhile, proceed with tomato bath preparation. In a wide pan, add and heat oil/ghee. Toast the ingredients listed in seasoning in the order mentioned. When mustard seeds start to jump around, add green chillies, onion and ginger. Cook for few minutes until the onions soften. Stir in chopped tomatoes and fresh green peas. Cook until tomatoes become mush.

Add about 4 cups of water along with half teaspoon of salt. Cover and bring the water to a boil. At this stage, pour in the roasted semolina/suji at a constant flow/speed, continuously stirrng. Take care not to form semolina lumps. Stir, stir and stir. Sprinkle charoli nuts. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until the whole thing comes together to a moist firm mass.

Serve hot with coconut/peanut chutney or with a cup of yogurt.


Tomato Bath with Yogurt and Cucumber Slices ~ Our Weekend Brunch and
My entry to JFI: Tomatoes hosted by RP of My Work Shop

JFI Notes:
I’ve planned to invite hosts for Jihva (June 07- April 08) on April 2nd. If you are interested to host the event, please visit tomorrow to read the guidelines and pickup your time slot. Thanks.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Tomato, Amma & Authentic Andhra, Suji/Semolina, Jihva For Ingredients (Sunday April 1, 2007 at 11:45 am- permalink)
Comments (25)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Dazzling Dals ~ Tomato Dal


Dazzling Dals ~ Tomato Dal (Tomato Pappu)

I get lot of questions about the recipes I write at Mahanandi. Some show a mix of disdain and curiosity typical of a museum visitor and some convey a genuine interest. I live in a foreign country, still I cook and write about the food of my home. I guess it is expected to get both types of comments on my recipes.

When people show genuine interest, it feels good and I try to respond to their comments. One such genuinely interested person is Linda of Out of the Garden food blog. From her comments, I had a sense that she is very fond of one particular recipe of mine. So, whenever Linda inquired about the details, I replied her with equal enthusiasm. Guess what! She not only used the recipe to prepare the dish, but she also perfected the process and wrote about it on her blog. The recipe is none other than the dazzling dal, my beloved amma mudda. Linda’s description of amma muddas truly conveys her enthusiasm and a delight to read. I thank Linda for treating the recipe and the feelings associated with it with respect. I will think of her amma mudda post as a great gift to Mahanandi on its second anniversary.

Here is one more dazzling dal recipe - tomato dal. A basic and beginners favorite in Indian cooking, tomato dal is a simple and flavorful main course dish. Can be served with rice or chapatis for a hearty, satisfying meal.

Recipe:

• ½ cup toor dal and 1½ cups of water
• 1 big ripe tomato - cut to chunks
• 1 small onion - cut to chunks
• 6-8 green chillies - finely chopped
• ¼ tsp turmeric and marble-sized tamarind

- Take them all in a pressure cooker and cook until the dal reaches fall apart stage. Usually takes about 10 to 15 minutes in a pressure cooker. Once the valve pressure is released, remove the lid and add about half teaspoon of salt. Mix and mash the dal to soft consistency with a wood masher.

In a separate vessel, do the popu or tadka (toasting cumin, mustard seeds, curry leaves etc in oil). Add the mashed tomato dal to the popu. Mix and serve hot with rice or with chapati.


Tomato Dal mixed with Rice and on the side Green Brinjal Curry ~ Our lunch today
and my entry to JFI: Tomato hosted by Lovely RP of My Workshop

Notes:
Recipe source: Amma

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Toor Dal, Tomato, Amma & Authentic Andhra, Jihva For Ingredients (Wednesday March 28, 2007 at 5:22 pm- permalink)
Comments (52)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Plain Potato Curry for Jihva~Potato

Vijay went through a severe case of flu-like illness last week. It started suddenly with fever and within a day it got worse with 104 °F temperature. We had to go to emergency and after several tests the doctors diagnosis was Acute Viral Syndrome. With prescription Tylenol, fever is under control now and he is recovering slowly. Poor guy, he dropped nearly eight pounds in a week. That bad. Compared to him, I had a very mild case of flu. Mainly I lost appetite. Sonti Kashayam, tomato rasam, plain toordal rasam, orange juice and capsules in-between - that’s all we could manage these past few days.

We are feeling better today and I couldn’t resist participating in Jihva~Potato event hosted from Pune, India by lovely Vaishali Kamath of Happy Burp. I prepared potato curry for lunch. Just plain, light oil and no onion, the variety we usually have on festival days. Nice, simple side dish and good to recover the appetite.


Red Potato ~ Raw, Cooked and Cubed

Recipe:

Boil or pressure-cook 4 medium sized potatoes to tender. Peel and remove the skin. Cut the potatoes to cubes.

In a wide skillet, heat a teaspoon of oil. Add and toast a half teaspoon each - cumin, mustard seeds, dried red chilli pieces and curry leaves. Add the potato cubes. Sprinkle turmeric, red chilli flakes and salt to taste. If you want you can also add fresh grated coconut and garam masala powder to taste. Mix and cook on medium heat for about 5 to 10 minutes until potato pieces brown a bit. Serve hot with a cup of rice and dal or rasam.

Plain Potato Curry and Microwave Oven Baked Potato Chips with Plain Toordal Rasam and Rice
Plain Potato Curry and Microwave Oven Baked Potato Chips with Plain Toor dal Rasam and Rice
Our Meal Today and My Entry to Jihva~Potato Event by Vaishali of Happy Burp

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Potato, Amma & Authentic Andhra, Jihva For Ingredients (Thursday March 1, 2007 at 2:04 pm- permalink)
Comments (29)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Ginger~Garlic~Coriander Paste : For Jihva (Allam Vellulli Kottimera Mudda)

Root vegetables, as if happy to be unearthed, usually mingle well with other vegetables by being subtly sweet. But when it comes to Gingerroot-the rhizome, it’s quite another story.

Like an unruly tiny tot, ginger is full of attitude. Potent, pungent and incomparable, it is nothing like other rhizomes or root vegetables. To put it gingerly, ginger is never needed in pounds, just a small quantity is enough to liven up an otherwise ordinary culinary experience. And Indian cuisine, one of the mother cuisines in the world, pairs ginger with garlic and coriander. The pungency of ginger is controlled and counteracted with more pungent flavors. What a way to civilize the taste of ginger! A perfect pairing appreciated by mature palates.

Ginger, garlic and coriander, together ground into a smooth paste is something that I often use in my daily cooking. Almost all traditional tomato and coconut based curries (pulusu, subjis) need at least a teaspoon of ginger-garlic-coriander paste. So depending on the market price of these three ingredients or my time constraints, I prepare this paste in quantities large (which would last for at least two weeks) or small (just enough for that day’s meal).

Here is my recipe for ginger-garlic-coriander paste, and an entry to “Jihva for Ginger” event. Hosted from Scotland by lovely Rosie of “What’s the recipe today, Jim?”.


Ginger-Garlic-Coriander Paste ~ for “Jihva : Ginger” event.

Recipe:

Ginger root - peeled, sliced to small pieces - Half cup
Garlic - peeled and sliced to small pieces - Quarter cup
Fresh coriander (cilantro) -finely chopped - 1 cup
Salt - quarter teaspoon

Take them all in a blender/food processor or in a mortar. Grind them to smooth consistency without adding water. Remove to a clean glass jar, seal tightly and store in the refrigerator. (Remains fresh from one week up to a month.) Whenever needed, take the required amount with a clean spoon.

To Jihva participants:
Rosie is in the process of moving and requesting “Jihva-Ginger” entries as early as possible.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in The Essentials, Indian Ingredients, Indian Kitchen, Kottimera(Cilantro), Ginger & Sonti, Jihva For Ingredients (Monday January 29, 2007 at 2:33 pm- permalink)
Comments (13)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Coconut (Kobbari, Nariyal, Kopra or Thenga)

Coconut - Young and Mature
Young coconut removed from its hard outer green shell and
Mature Coconut

Young Coconut and Coconut Water
The top of the young coconut is cut using a sharp knife for sweet coconut water and to remove tender coconut pieces. Pure and fulfilling food!

Fresh Coconut Water and Fresh, Young Coconut
Divine Coconut Water and Delicious Coconut Pieces
Sacred and Nourishing Treat ~ to Toast the New Year: 2007
My Entry to Jihva for January, hosted by Ashwini of Food for Thought.

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in The Essentials, Naivedyam(Festival Sweets), Indian Ingredients, Indian Kitchen, Coconut (Fresh), Jihva For Ingredients (Monday January 1, 2007 at 1:21 pm- permalink)
Comments (7)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Janthikalu (Murukulu)

I have seen cookbooks on lentils, rice and on vegetables but never a cookbook dedicated to flours. I am glad that Santhi of Me and My Kitchen, the host of Jihva for Ingredients for August chose a topic covering all types of grain flours to feature for Jihva.

Like Linda, I also had several ideas for JFI, but decided to go with old classic crunchy snack - Janthikalu (murukulu). For us, the best snack foods are made at home, so for our vacation trip last week and to munch during our travel, I had prepared janthikalu (murukulu), using rice flour, gram flour (besan) and moong dal flour. For seasoning I have added salt, chilli powder, cumin, ajwan (carom seeds), sesame seeds and mashed potato. Deep-fried in peanut oil (I find that peanut oil works best for deep-frying and tastes delicious) in batches, janthikalu are our favorite snack item and my entry to JFI~Flour.

Thanks Santhi for hosting JFI and looking forward to reading the recap.

Recipe in detail - Here.


Ingredients for janthikalu and cookie press with different discs to prepare janthikalu


Dough is ready for placing in cookie press and for deep frying


Deep frying janthikalu in peanut oil


Janthikalu - for JFI~Flour

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Amma & Authentic Andhra, Gram Flour (Besan), Rice Flour, Moong Flour, Jihva For Ingredients (Tuesday August 1, 2006 at 7:44 pm- permalink)
Comments (25)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

Mirchi Bajji ~ Hyderabadi Style

Some foods I cook for healthy body and some for mental health. Mirchi bajji belongs to later category for me. Cravings and nostalgia motivate me to cook this deliciously hot recipe. Hyderabad, the capital city of my home state Andhra Pradesh has a unique recipe for stuffed bajjis. I have already blogged about mirchi bajjis with different stuffing’s from different regions in India but thought this famous Hyderabadi style mirchi bajji deserves one more post dedicated to it.

Chilli bajjis, the popular street food are incredibly easy to prepare at home and make an excellent way to begin almost any special meal or they can be served as a light meal/snack on busy days. Because we remove the middle thick white vein that carries the seeds, these chilli bajjis are surprisingly mild and not that hot at all.


Reducing the spice kick of chillies by removing the white vein with seeds.

Recipe:
(for 20 chillies)

Preparing the filling to stuff the chillies:
Sesame seeds - 3 tablespoons
Dried coconut powder - 3 tablespoons
Coriander seeds (dhania) - 1 teaspoon (dry roast these 3 to pale gold color)
Salt - ¼ teaspoon
Tamarind juice - 1 tablespoon
Take them all in a blender or spice mill - make a smooth paste without adding water. Remove to a cup.

Mirchi (Chillies) Preparation:
Pick 20 straight, plump, healthy looking chillies. Wash and dry them in a kitchen towel. With a sharp knife make a vertical slit in the middle of chilli on one side. Keep the ends intact (see the photo above). Insert the knife tip and pluck the thick white vein in the middle along with the seeds. Usually it will come off nicely with a sharp knife. After preparing all chillies in this way, start stuffing. Fill the gap with the sesame filling nice and evenly one by one and keep them aside on a plate.

Preparing the batter to dip stuffed chillies:
Besan (gram flour) - 2 cups, sieved
Rice flour - ¼ cup, sieved
Salt, cumin and ajwan (vaamu) - ½ tsp each
Take them all in a vessel, mix to combine. Adding water, prepare medium thick batter of thick buttermilk consistency.

Deep-frying:
Take about 3 to 4 cups of peanut oil in a deep bottomed skillet or kadai. Heat the oil on medium-high. One by one dip the bajjis in batter and gently drop from the sides of kadai into hot oil and deep fry until golden. Remove to a paper towel covered plate and let cool a minute or two. Serve with some limejuice sprinkled and finely sliced onions and tomatoes on the side.
(I’ve dipped the bajjis in batter again and double fried them for that true taste.)


Mirchi Bajjis with Chickpea Guggullu and Watermelon Granita (Ice) with Cherries
Our Comforting Meal and My Entries to
Santhi’s JFI~Flour and also to Revathi’s FMR~Comfort Foods

Watermelon Granita with Cherries
Watermelon juice, limejuice mixed and frozen for about 4 hours. The ice is crushed (gently with a hammer) and cut cherries are added before serving

Posted by Indira©Copyrighted in Green Chillies, Amma & Authentic Andhra, Flour(Pindi), Gram Flour (Besan), Rice Flour, Cherries, Peppers, Jihva For Ingredients (Monday July 31, 2006 at 3:18 pm- permalink)
Comments (46)

The New Home of Mahanandi: www.themahanandi.org

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